Some Quick Notes on the 2014 Election

WeakGOPby N. A. Halkides   10/31/14
After six long, miserable years of misrule by Barack Hussein Obama and a Democratic-held Senate, this should by rights be a blowout election with massive Republican gains and a lot of shell-shocked Democrats making excuses on Wednesday morning.  Instead, many Senate races are so close that Republicans may not even win control of that body, when a 55-seat majority was certainly obtainable.  What happened?

What happened was that the Republican Party is still under the control of its Establishment, which has but one electoral strategy:  wait for the Democrats to screw up so badly that you get a small lead in the polls you didn’t earn and then sit on it, hoping it carries you through the election.  The silence from Republicans has been deafening.  Here are some things we haven’t heard from them:

  • Obamacare has caused millions of Americans to lose the health insurance they were perfectly happy with and raised the costs of insurance for others in a massive wealth-transference scheme – the worst way possible to handle the problem of the uninsured.  Vote Republican to get your good insurance back.
  • Democrats are rabidly anti-gun and want to gradually erode the right to bear arms.  California, New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey are probably the worst offenders, but everywhere Democrats have control, gun rights are endangered.  If you care about your gun rights, vote Republican.
  • Moving from the Second Amendment to the First, Senate Democrats recently proposed repealing it.  Yes, they did – they want to control criticism of incumbents (themselves).  If you believe in the right of free speech, vote Republican.
  • Democrats have used, and are still using, the IRS to harass and abuse their political opponents.  If you want the IRS finally brought under control, vote Republican.
  • Democrats want to flood this country with at least 11 million (and probably many more) new legal immigrants by granting an amnesty to the illegal aliens already present.  Yes, they want to import a number Central and South American peasants about equal to the present population of Illinois (the 5th largest state!) at a time when Americans can’t find work.  Obviously, these illegals are either on welfare or taking jobs that should have gone to American citizens.  Democrats are trying to do this because they don’t care about ordinary Americans or the health hazards of allowing disease-riddled immigrants to come to this country, or about the dangers of failing to secure our southern border against terrorists and criminals, because they know that should these illegals become legalized, the inevitable result will be that many of them will become citizens and proceed to vote probably 70% Democratic.  Yes, Establishment Republicans won’t oppose amnesty even though it means the end of the GOP as a (potential) opposition party to the Democratic Left.  That is how slavishly they follow the wishes of large business interests.  Note that some individual Republicans have been doing well by using the immigration issue, for example Scott Brown in New Hampshire, but the Establishment stubbornly refuses to budge on this issue.
  • National security – the Democrats are so bad here I won’t even levy any specific charges.  Suffice it to say that Democrats are vulnerable – if called on their policies, which they haven’t been.

Why such a passive approach from Establishment Republicans when direct attacks on Democratic vulnerabilities would be so effective?  The answer is partly intellectual and partly dispositional.  Establishment-men are uniformly un-intellectual, caring little for political ideas, and therefore have absorbed by default the prevailing political idea of our time – statism.  They don’t really oppose the Democrats’ welfare state schemes, at least not in principle, but only object slightly to the excessive costs.  By disposition, Establishment-men view their Democratic opponents basically as members of the same exclusive country club rather than as deadly enemies to be fought with all the energy they can muster – a deadly misconception on their part.

One other factor comes into play in a few races, namely the failure of the Establishment to capitalize on opportunities to weaken the opposition.  The most obvious case is Scott Walker’s bid for re-election as Wisconsin Governor.  In Scott Walker on Close Inspection, I criticized Walker’s failure to strike a mortal blow at Wisconsin’s public sector unions when he had the chance.  I likened what he had done to poking a snake with a sharp stick instead of cutting its head off, the danger of course being that the snake could still strike back.  Well, since then the snake has indeed struck back as the unions have poured millions of dollars into defeating Walker, and the race is now a dead heat.  Even though other factors are in play, such as the Democrats abusing the criminal law to harass Walker, if he loses the unions will probably have been the deciding factor.

Republicans need to learn that Democrats have tilted the playing field heavily in their favor by creating a welfare state and a massive public sector bureaucracy.  Anything Republicans can do to reduce welfare state dependency, decrease the number of public sector workers, or reduce their power by breaking their unions, will help to restore some balance.  Where an opportunity exists to smash a public sector union, Republicans must take it.

Walker and other Republicans may still win, but if they do it will be more to luck than political skill.  The GOP Establishment is plainly hopeless.  The only solution to America’s problems is a party willing to fight the Democrats on principle, and that means either Conservative control of the Republican Party or a new Conservative party.


Nik is a freelance writer, former professor, and has written for FrontPage Magazine.
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18 Responses to Some Quick Notes on the 2014 Election

  1. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    What happened was that the Republican Party is still under the control of its Establishment, which has but one electoral strategy:  wait for the Democrats to screw up so badly that you get a small lead in the polls you didn’t earn and then sit on it, hoping it carries you through the election. 

    Great point, Nik. And this means that if the Republicans win, there is no mandate for them to do anything.

    Why such a passive approach from Establishment Republicans when direct attacks on Democratic vulnerabilities would be so effective?  The answer is partly intellectual and partly dispositional.  Establishment-men are uniformly un-intellectual, caring little for political ideas, and therefore have absorbed by default the prevailing political idea of our time – statism.  They don’t really oppose the Democrats’ welfare state schemes, at least not in principle, but only object slightly to the excessive costs.  By disposition, Establishment-men view their Democratic opponents basically as members of the same exclusive country club rather than as deadly enemies to be fought with all the energy they can muster – a deadly misconception on their part.

    This is very well said. And this is something that I think few conservatives understand. It’s therefore not enough to get Republican majorities. I would also add that many of these Republicans despise conservatives. They have grown up in the same poisoned secular culture that looks down on actually having firm moral values based in something other than “free stuff” pragmatism.

  2. Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

    Nik,

    Have you followed Scott in Florida as well? If so, how would you compare his term to Walker’s? Scott appears to be even with or slightly behind that scoundrel Crist. What lessons can be learned from that situation?

    • NAHALKIDES NAHALKIDES says:

      I’m embarrassed to admit I haven’t followed Scott in Florida as closely as I have Walker in Wisconsin. Location is part of the reason – here in northern Illinois, I had a chance to witness the Democrats’ shenanigans in WI at almost first-hand – the Democratic Senators decamped not that far from me when they fled WI to avoid the Senate having a quorum. The rest is simply time – I just haven’t had enough of it to follow Scott. I pegged him as an Establishment-man, though, when he allowed that travesty of justice, the George Zimmerman prosecution, to go forward under RINO Angela Correy. And his inability to put any daylight between himself and Crist is almost certainly due to his unwillingness to fight Crist on ideological grounds. If he pulls out a victory, it will probably be only because of his portrayal of Crist as a flip-flopper, which is certainly true but at the same time an insufficient criticism.

      • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

        Being in Texas, I have also not followed Scott very closely. From the little I have read about him he appears to be a very mixed bag.

        But I would certainly prefer to have the governorship of Florida in the hands of a Republican, given the coming 2016 presidential election.

  3. GHG says:

    The majority of my fellow citizens re-elected Obama after his first term could not be seen for anything other then an abject failure in every possible way. I have no faith that enough Americans are paying better attention now than they were two years ago. Too many people either don’t care enough to make an effort to get informed or they agree with the notion that government, through the taxes of the “rich”, should take care of them.

    I’m by nature an optimist but I’m also a realist. I hope the tide of socialism starts to recede but I’m not optimistic.

  4. Rosalys says:

    God save us from bastard Republicans! I am going to vote Republican on Tuesday, but sometimes I wonder, “Why?” Because I can’t in good conscience vote for a Democrat or even give them the benefit of my voting for no one, since they are usually far, far worse by several degrees of magnitude. There have been exceptions – Missing Linc Chaffee for one was just as bad as any far left wing Dem out there (and that was when he was still a Republican!) There do seem to be several candidates who might attempt to make a difference for the good if they were to get in, but that seems unlikely. I must admit I haven’t been paying all that much attention this election cycle as I have become very jaded. The real problem is “we the people” who have sold our birthright for a mess of pottage. Decry the politicians all you like! They wouldn’t be where they are if they weren’t voted in. In a truly moral and just society these elections shouldn’t be anywhere near close enough to steal!

  5. Timothy Lane says:

    One thing to note is that while the GOP as a group has no message, individual candidates certainly do, and many have made the same points you did (for example, both Cotton and Brown have heavily criticized immigration amnesty — apparently Cotton has even pointed out the supply-and-demand explanation for why Big Business likes it).

    As for Scott Walker, the fact remains that he (and Sam Brownback in Kansas, and for that matter Thom Tillis in North Carolina) is in trouble for pushing through a conservative agenda. He could have done better; but the opposition (including the corrupt legal shenanigans, which are to be expected of liberals) is from his actions, not his omissions.

    But you’re quite right that the basic Republican failing is to expose Democrats for what they really are: Fascist gangsters who wish to take Chicago machine politics and apply it to the whole nation for the purpose of setting up a monolithic totalitarian state.

    • NAHALKIDES NAHALKIDES says:

      What I meant, Tim, is that Walker failed to see that the unions would strike back at him with everything they could muster, and that therefore, the winning tactic was to destroy the unions completely at the outset instead of just forcing them to pay a little more for their insurance. Republicans had sufficient power to outlaw the unions, which would have made it impossible for them to raise money or do anything else – they would have ceased to exist. As it is, they are still alive and still causing trouble.

      Destroying the public sector unions is going to be an important tactic for our side if we want to take back our country – they collude with Democrats to rip off the taxpayer, and serve to get the Democrats more money and votes than they would otherwise have.

      • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

        It will probably take a confrontation like that which took place in the U.K. between the Miners’ Union and Thatcher’s government in the mid 1980’s. It took months to defeat the union, but Thatcher stood firm and broke the union’s back.

        The union leader, Arthur Scargill, was a notorious commie (called Red Arthur) thus was pretty easy to attack. The problem with SEIU and the teachers’ unions is the public does not know the leaders’ names or their backgrounds. If some governor decides to attack these Leftists, they must become household names connected to faces. And their socialist/communist backgrounds must be clearly brought to the public eye.

      • Timothy Lane says:

        I agree that Republicans would do best to get rid of public employee unions, using FDR’s own words to explain why. But even if Walker had done that, the unions would still have had plenty of resources to seek to destroy him (for revenge as well as to reverse the decision), since most of that comes from out of state.

  6. Skepticalcynic says:

    Sometimes it takes nearly a lifetime to see through all of the clutter. When I was young, I thought that the American people were dumber than a door knob when it came to politics and their self interests…(why Goldwater lost). Later on, I began to think maybe there was enough bright people and they weren’t as dumb as I thought….(why Reagan won). Say what you want bad about Reagan, he stopped double digit inflation). Now that I have gotten old and gray headed, I have finally got a clear picture. I was right the first time, most Americans are dumb as a rock…(witness Clinton, Bush II, and Obama). Those of you that are not watching football, basketball, golf, hockey, Survivor, The Amazing Race and others of their ilk probably have figured out what is happening to America…..We are in the minority and will suffer with the rock heads when it all goes south. This crap about voting is a fraud the size of Social Security. It takes hundreds or thousands of votes to count. I can say in complete honesty, that my votes over my lifetime has never changed the outcome of anyone running in an election!

    • Timothy Lane says:

      Aloise Buckley Heath (sister of Bill and Jim) told a story about her children asking her in 1964 if it would be a mortal sin to vote for LBJ. She replied that it would be for her because she knew better, but not for most people because they didn’t know any better.

  7. David Ray says:

    Halkides has a point about liberal prosecutors. These other examples show that their victims aren’t relegated to an exclusive club. Consider the following . . .

    Tom Delay:
    Ronnie Earl exhausted FIVE grand juries so he could bust Delay on a campaign contribution that was legal at the time – and something the DNC did during the same time period. (Imagine if Ken Starr had so embarrassed himself.)

    Duke Lacrosse Team:
    Nifong clearly let an emotional mob-mentality (Jesse Jackson and company involved) to be his criteria in pursuing charges. He was either stupid, a coward, or a sell-out. I suspect all three.

    Sarah Palin:
    Sued with ethics allegations until she finally removed herself as a lightning-rod. (Sarah, having been called worse, would’ve easily traded a “slut” insult for the endless legal abuse. Excuse me, but who’s warring against women again??)

    Newt Gingrich:
    A consumed low-life named David Bonnior filed endless ethics complaints (well into the 300’s) until Newt caved, with the help of the Martin’s illegally taping his phone-call.
    The campaign/IRS mind-numbing complex legal system literally falls down to the coin-flip of how a judge interprets. (The bias of a liberal judge is more predictable.)

    Catherine Engelbrecht:
    That Texas gal thought stuffing the ballot box was wrong; However, Little Barry’s administration thought it was fair compensation, so they sicced the IRS, FBI, and OSHA on her and her family. (A conspiracy? Maybe. The MSM might look into it only after exhausting their efforts looking for a non-existent one in Ferguson, MO.)

    The Romeike family:
    They sought legal immigration here (under asylum) so as to home-school their children. Trouble is that Eric Holder’s only interested in allowing illegal immigration, so he wants them gone.

    Billy Dale:
    Firing the Travel Office staff was in the Clinton’s right, but the narcissists wanted it to look good in the press. So they slandered Mr. Dale using the FBI, the IRS, and a lengthy trial – in which he was acquitted. (Too bad that PR stunt back-fired on the Clintons, but hey . . . it only cost Billy Dale HIS retirement funds. The Clinton’s nest egg is doing fine.)

    Scott Walker:
    I had no idea of his plight, until this article was posted. I bet some of you keen minds know of some others that have been subject to this particular version of vicious harassment.
    To sum up, we need honest prosecutors to pursue those that do us harm; which, at times, include indicting malicious prosecutors who game the system. (And to think liberal minds like Arthur Miller portray US in the Crucible.)

    • Timothy Lane says:

      One note here: Right after the Clintons came in, they replaced a bunch of old ladies in the mailroom with supporters. Again, this was legal, but it also proved to be an embarrassment. That’s why, when Harry Thomason wanted to take over the business provided by the Travel Office, they decided to trump up legal charges instead of simply firing Dale and his staff.

      • David Ray says:

        I barely remember being told that. It’s very opaque and I kinda remember a lady from that office musing: “be careful what you pray for . . . “?

        I was told that she, like Billy Dale, also voted for Clinton and wanted to retire from a Democratic administration – like going out on a high note. (Guess she got off lucky.)

        Also, just one more small thing; HOW the hell are you gents italicizing your words, damn it!? (i.e. I so wanted “US” to be written as, well . . . I don’t yet know how.)

        • NAHALKIDES NAHALKIDES says:

          To italicize, encase the words between the two tags [i] and [/i]; to boldface use [b]text will appear in boldface[/b] where the square brackets (sometimes used with bulletin board code) are replaced by the “less than” and “greater than” symbols (standard HTML code). It’s difficult to print the > and < symbols which is why I used the square brackets to indicate the syntax.

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