Movie Review: La La Land

by Tim Jones1/20/17
La La Land Makes a Conservative Movie Called “La La Land”  •  There is a certain irony that the movie La La Land at its core is a movie based on conservative values such as the preservation and timelessness of tradition, obligation and self-sacrifice. They may seem somewhat cliche to some, but in the context of the hyper-liberalism of Hollywood, aka, “La La Land,” these stood out as the primary themes in a movie that could also be described as that of two aspiring artists whose ultimate destiny was determined by the competing tension between love and ambition.

It was Edmund Burke, the original conservative, who first promoted the idea that tradition and obligation are most important for a well-functioning society. In the book The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine and the Birth of Right and Left by Yuval Levin, it highlights the contrast between Burke’s philosophy and that of one of the original liberals, Thomas Paine, who thought it was choice and individualism that provides the highest societal good. Burke’s philosophy acknowledges restraint and limitations as necessary preconditions for freedom whereas Paine’s thought carried out to its logical conclusion leads to selfishness and narcissism, and eventually to nihilism. These are not exactly the kind of characteristics that lead to an ideal society because they open the door to all kind of problematic excesses we see in today’s hyper-permissiveness and lack of self-restraint, most notably abuse and addiction to drugs, alcohol, gambling and pornography, just to name a few.

Gosling’s character Sebastian is distraught that jazz is a dying art form and he wants to make it his mission to help save it. As an aspiring jazz pianist, he struggles to make ends meet while Emma Stone’s character Mia keeps getting rejected in trying to make it in Hollywood, as a successful actress. Sebastian feels obligated to keep alive something that despite being drowned out by more modern forms of music he believes in the tradition of something that is beautiful and timeless. On another level, the movie itself could be considered a conservative ‘throwback’ to the musicals of the past, an acknowledgement of something that is also something old, beautiful and timeless – and possibly an attempt to revive a genre in movies that is all but dead just as happened with animated movies.

The movie takes a major turning point when Sebastian returns home and surprises Mia one night after being on the road with a jazz band (featuring John Legend). He joined the band because it paid well but caused him to set aside his dream of starting his own jazz club. He wanted Mia to join him for a two-week gig the band had in Boise but she feels she can’t take the time out of the work she’s putting in to writing a play despite his plea that she could still use a laptop no matter her location. Mia gets upset with him because she feels like Sebastian should be pursuing his dream of starting a night club. But Sebastian in turn gets upset with her because he believes he’s doing the right thing since he thought she wanted him to have a regular job with a regular paycheck in order to pay the bills. Here his obligation overrules his dream and there appears to be big misunderstanding between the two that is the beginning of the end of their relationship.

Every day people are told to follow their dreams by the purveyors of self-actualization but there is always the danger that they won’t be realized. The conservative principle of self-sacrifice that comes with obligation is the real way to authentic charity for both family and others, one in which Sebastian is following in the movie. And with grace many people will still realize their dreams while at the same time doing it in meeting their obligations.

It’s just when dreams are put ahead of obligations that they become an exercise in selfishness usually with a healthy dose of narcissism. Sebastian’s belief that sacrifice is more important than his dream in the end leads to the grace that allows both he and Mia to fulfill their artistic dreams. La La Land is another example of how Edmund Burke was the ultimate winner in his ‘great debate’ with Thomas Paine. And perhaps liberal “La la land” is beginning to find value in making movies based on conservative values. • (471 views)

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4 Responses to Movie Review: La La Land

  1. Timothy Lane says:

    Hollywood has had a number of movies based on conservative and/or religious values — as long as they aren’t too obvious about it, and in particular don’t make an overt political point.

    • David Ray says:

      Dennis Prager has also seen movies of note. What he does note is that even good ones often have a vicious jab at conservatives.

      Examples: In “Jerry Maquire” Tom Cruise had to quip how he “felt like Clarene Thomas” for attempting a sexual harrasing kiss.
      In “Charlie Wilson’s War”, while discussing Afghanistan, one of congrssmen have to snipe “Reagan asked ‘is that thing still going on?'” (Liberals, who take their history from cinema, began calling in talk shows and bragged that it was congressman Wilson who really defeated the Soviets; not Reagan. At least dumbass libs finally acknowledged that the U.S. won the cold war.)

      • Timothy Lane says:

        Of course, one should note that the characters in Charlie Wilson’s War were politicians, and Wilson was a Democrat (from Texas, but no conservative). They may well have said something like that, though I think it would be likelier in public than in private.

        Incidentally, La-La Land made John Hanlon’s top 10 list of 2016 movies at Town Hall (he does movie reviews for them).

  2. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    In the book The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine and the Birth of Right and Left by Yuval Levin, it highlights the contrast between Burke’s philosophy and that of one of the original liberals, Thomas Paine, who thought it was choice and individualism that provides the highest societal good. Burke’s philosophy acknowledges restraint and limitations as necessary preconditions for freedom whereas Paine’s thought carried out to its logical conclusion leads to selfishness and narcissism, and eventually to nihilism.

    This dynamic between market-appetites and individual restraint (sometime imposed restraint) is a difficult one. One hopes that what we had once considered a Classic Western Civilization education would deal with this and provide wisdom and balance for a perplexing topic. You can, of course, find statists on one extreme and libertines or libertarians on the other. The proper baby-bear balance is toward the middle.

    But today’s Snowflake generations rarely think in terms of balance. The message today is “extreme” even while the Snowflakes lament the polarization of society.

    As your ideal wise and balanced conservative (in theory, at least…and we always need good theory), I recognize the need of market-freedom to unleash the sheer inventiveness of man, unbound (but not altogether unrestrained) by the various Snowflakes of society — right or left — who get their panties instinctively in a bunch over something new. America is built upon this dynamism.

    But it does not consist only of this dynamism. We also have structure…that dreaded top-down structure that, if it becomes too much, becomes stultifying, if not outright Communistic and totalitarian. But without some appropriate amount and kind of structure — best rooted in Judeo-Christian principles and Western philosophy — we are but atoms of appetites bouncing against the walls.

    I’ll have to find this movie if I can, Tim. I don’t hold out much hope these days that any modern movie can have any theme other than a libertine one. But so you have said that one exists.

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