Morning Maunderings

Meanderby Anniel2/15/16
Maunder, verb. Disconnected and idle thinking about unrelated subjects. My husband Bear and I often maunder through many thoughts in the morning before time to rise.

READING AND DYSLEXIA
Is reading being mistaught on an industrial scale to keep our children impoverished in mind and spirit? Is dyslexia a deliberately manufactured condition used to dumb down the children? Bruce Deitrick Price, educator, and sometimes contributer to ST, thinks so. See his article: Dyslexia Is a Myth

Read it and see what you think. Education needs to be salvaged.

GREAT ORATORS
What is an orator? What does it take to be a great one? Back in the days when people were entertained, educated and led by great speakers, the orators had to master certain necessary skills to fulfill their calling.

The Athenian Demosthenes, considered the greatest orator of all time, was said to have had a speech impediment, perhaps stuttering. He also grimaced, rolled his eyes and had other facial tics that made him laughable. After his first failures at public speaking, he reportedly went to the seashore and began shouting over the roaring of the waves for hours at a time. When he knew his speech and diction had improved, he put a pebble into his mouth and practiced again, then added another pebble, and practiced anew. He recited verses while he ran and his breath was short. He built an underground room in which to study and strengthen his voice and lungs. He recited poetry and made certain his gestures and facial expressions matched his voice and message perfectly.

He WORKED and did not speak in public again until he knew how to speak superbly and project his voice without straining it. He led Athenians through the power of his speech.

When the Macedonians conquered Athens, they exiled Demosthenes from his beloved home because he urged rebellion against them. He thought he had failed in his duty to rouse the Athenians in time to save themselves. He eventually committed suicide rather than be used as a political tool against his people.

IS OBAMA A “GREAT” ORATOR?
Why does everyone, even his enemies, insist on giving lip service to the idea that Obama is a “great” orator when obviously he is not? The head swiveling between teleprompters says he is not. His lies, tics and tells say he is not. I’m not even sure he reads all that well. But an orator, please, he’s not even a good speaker. His jerky cadence when the teleprompters are absent is simply embarrassing.

Every public appearance by Obama is scripted and carefully staged. People become props in his Kabuki Theater of the absurd. Remember the diabetic pregnant woman from San Diego he caught in his arms when she was shoved forward to faint on cue? Obama didn’t even turn his head to look at her, just stuck his arms back to catch. What about dressing people up as backdrops in the White House and the State of the Union speeches? Doctors in scrubs, Arab immigrants, etc. Good grief.

But his minions eat it up and beg for more. Why?

ANTONIN SCALIA
We need to weep today at the news of a great man’s death. A new judge will be nominated by a lesser man and voted for by even lesser men, like Paul Ryan, who have no convictions or courage. Scalia is such a loss to people who love the Constitution and our country as founded.

LEARNING LOGIC
How do people learn truth and logic? Is it possible to learn truth or logical thinking if a person cannot read well, or after having heard only falsehoods their entire life?

Must people be taught to think logically? Is it important to do so at an early age so that logic becomes engrained in their character?

There are so many ways to teach a child, but adults sometimes forget how children learn. They first learn the names of large things. This is a tree, the whole thing is a tree. Then they learn that the tree has a trunk, branches, twigs, leaves; that leaves have different shapes, veins, and colors; that other trees have different shapes, that some have no leaves, but have needles and cones.

Children learn their bodies the same way: this is you, a person, not a dog or a cat. Then they learn the parts of their bodies: first arms, shoulders, elbows, hands, then fingers, nails. A natural progression of arms and legs. And we play “This Little Piggy”, “Patty Cake”, and “Let me steal your belly button” for a reason.

If you take children for a walk down a road, you teach them to face oncoming traffic and tell them why. You show them where and how to cross a street. How to ride a bicycle safely. You could say you teach them the logic of being safe in as many ways as possible. To prepare them for the future.

Different environments demand different logic. We, for instance, had to teach our children what to do if a moose came meandering down the road. Learning to live in parts of Chicago takes a different form of logic.

Somehow the rules of higher logic got shifted away from what is true and good, and we raise adults who are not able to process any higher thoughts in a logical manner. Students are taught throughout their school years to accept lies. Even when the teachings make no sense they are to accept them anyway. The logic required in mathematics is bastardized from the beginning. And the formal rules of logic are negated entirely in so-called higher education lest a mind break free and a person think for him or her self.

Can one learn logic after a certain age, or are people so lost they can never recover their heritage?

LAST MAUNDER – WHEN DID TRUTH BECOME HATE?
“Truth is hate to those who hate the Truth.” Anonymous

Only Truth can really heal, make a person whole and healthy again. As long as we fight truth we lose the battle with our greatest enemy – ourselves. An honest look into the mirror can be a stunning thing when we finally recognize what we are and decide to change our own weaknesses.

When did the search for truth become lost to the world? A hopeless cause with no cure? Even those stubborn things called FACTS become lost in the mists of time. And civilization dies faster and faster before our very eyes.

Is it too late to save ourselves and our country? I do not think so. I believe that the great Creator God still cares for our land and for those who follow His Words. Looking forward, educating ourselves and our families and practicing logic, gratitude and love are the last hope we have. The love will have to be tough enough, WE, you and I, will have to be tough enough, to cauterize our wounds, stem the infection, and make a difference.

Stay Happy and Be Tough. • (634 views)

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12 Responses to Morning Maunderings

  1. Timothy Lane says:

    Scalia’s replacement will be voted on (or not) in the Senate, not the House, so Paul Ryan will have no direct say. Both Mitch McConnell and Charles Grassley (chairman of Judiciary) have said there will be no vote, but we shall see. Naturally, the Demagogues are insisting that this is irresponsible — and never mind that they said the same thing about a possible Bush nominee (which never happened) as early as mid-2007.

    Since this is something of a potpourri article, I will add a humor piece I’ve been wanting to do here. I came up with in the 1990s, but it remains VERY appropriate today. Q: How many Clintons does it take to change a light bulb? A: Three. One to make a public announcement of the change, one to hide all the documents, one to stonewall Congress, and one to lie about it.

    • Anniel says:

      Timothy, sorry about Mr. Ryan, while I was using him as a “type” because while I was writing he came on a news thing saying he had consulted with McConnell and we all know what that means. Roll over, bang, play dead.

  2. Bell Phillips says:

    This is a tree, the whole thing is a tree. Then they learn that the tree has a trunk, branches, twigs, leaves; that leaves have different shapes, veins, and colors; that other trees have different shapes, that some have no leaves, but have needles and cones.

    This is also the way science works, and, I suspect, the best way for adults to learn. I’ve heard it said, astutely, that we don’t have the steam engine because of the science of thermodynamics. We have the science of thermodynamics because of the steam engine.

    This seems utterly lost on college level educators. I was looking just up something in a sophomore level electronics text I have. I noticed that the first chapter was a lengthy analysis of quantum energy levels of excited electron states. This is of no use to 99.9% of practicing engineers (though quite important to the remainder). Michael Faraday learned quite a lot without it. And we marvel at the unpreparedness of recent graduates to do real work.

    If I may maunder a bit more in my education rant…

    Why is it that we never managed to get to the twentieth century in any history class I ever had? For 12 years we repeated Christopher Columbus, Pilgrims, George Washington, Abe Lincoln, oh look, it’s June already. I knew jack squat about westward expansion, the Spanish-American War, WWI, the Depression, WWII, Korea, Kennedy, Vietnam, the Moon Landing, Watergate. No high school student today can remember September 11. What are the odds that they’ve studied anything about it?

    And two final thoughts on math. #1, I wish I could deliver a solid punch in the face (or maybe groin) to every math teacher who failed to answer the ubiquitous “what are we ever going to use this for?” question. And, B, if you aren’t able to do “word problems,” then you have completely wasted your time in class.

    Just had to get that off my chest.

    • Anniel says:

      Sorry, I forgot that FIRST McConnell should posture and talk tough, THEN roll over and play dead.

    • Timothy Lane says:

      My high school history texts went further than that. The European history text definitely covered World War II; I recall it included a few of Hitler’s drawings (and we discussed them in class) as well as coverage of Mussolini (including his propaganda slogan — Credere, Obbedire, Combattere — which I then recognized when it showed up on a wall in the movie The Devil’s Brigade). The US history text included the Eisenhower era. I graduated in 1969, so those were quite comprehensive. I have no idea what’s taught today (to the extent that it can be said that anything is taught).

    • Anniel says:

      Bell, Love to hear your Maunderings. I have to leave you our this morning one.

      Our oldest grandson began bleeding from his eyes Thursday night and, of course, headed to the ER. Did you know there is a syndrome called Haemolacria? If you have sinus blockage of some sort and get a bloody nose the blood can come out through the lachrymose glands and it looks like you’re bleeding from your eyeballs. It’s not as rare as some articles make it sound, but one article says doctors are “baffled” by the condition, not so much. Anyhow, I was idly thinking about it this morning and suddenly I could see some first or second grader jumping up bleeding and screaming at school, the ambulance called, frightened children, teachers, school nurses, principals, etc. I had to laugh at the thought. I told Bear what I was thinking and he asked what I thought would happen when the kids got home and told their parents “What happened at school today?” By that time we were laughing so hard and trying to think what we would have thought if our kids had brought such a story home.

      If you were in second grade would you want to sit by the boy or girl who bleeds from their eyes? Would anyone ever forget?

  3. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    Somehow the rules of higher logic got shifted away from what is true and good, and we raise adults who are not able to process any higher thoughts in a logical manner. Students are taught throughout their school years to accept lies. Even when the teachings make no sense they are to accept them anyway. The logic required in mathematics is bastardized from the beginning. And the formal rules of logic are negated entirely in so-called higher education lest a mind break free and a person think for him or her self.

    One vital aspect of public schools and higher education is to garble the minds of our children and turn them into good Marxist cultural warriors. The magic of this is that it’s not just a matter of learning wrong facts. As harmful as this is, it doesn’t necessarily prevent the adoption of better facts as they come along.

    But what is happening with yutes is that their reasoning process itself is being corrupted. Their world view and information processing system is skewed so that better facts have little chance of getting in. We see this every time Islam, for example, kills someone and the apologists come out and tell us that it’s a “religion of peace” and the extremists who commit the murders have nothing to do with Islam.

    There are other aspects to this, of course. But primary is this indoctrination of what could be called a dumbvirus that makes people vapid, stupid, and dumb.

    • Anniel says:

      Brad, That scenario is why I think Bruce Price is right about dyslexia, a manufactured condition. I read a study a few years back that said the cure for dyslexia was to read, read, and read some more. But first you have to have access to the alphabet so you know the sounds the letters make. Too simple for our masters apparently. Indoctrination indeed.

      • Timothy Lane says:

        I gather that some people genuinely have some sort of difficulty that affects their reading, though it isn’t necessarily unrecoverable. The fantasy writer (and college professor) Jean Lorrah has described herself as dyslexic, for example. But it’s very likely that a lot of people receive the diagnosis simply to save teachers the bother (as is suggested at one point in Inferno by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, a modern updating of Dante).

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        I have a friend who is dyslexic. He’s on this site as well. If he reads this, maybe he’ll tell us a little of his experience.

        It’s obvious that poor teaching techniques can severely effect someone’s ability to learn. I don’t know what causes dyslexia. But we do know that there are many newfangled teaching techniques that replace proven ones. Novelty seems to trump respect for the children.

  4. Lucia says:

    Some people, maybe too many of them, can’t tell the difference between what’s true and what’s not even if it hits them between the eyes. These people prefer gossip over facts, believe what their friends say because friends would never steer them wrong, and gravitate towards wives tales or conspiracy theories instead of doing their own research or seeking out experts. When faced with the truth, they plain don’t recognize it. They could be good hearted, generous people, salt of the earth, but it seems they make decisions based on emotion instead of using logic. An old friend of mine told me that the best president we’ve ever had was Jimmy Carter because he was such a good man. All you can do with friends like that is love them anyway.

  5. Timothy Lane says:

    Since this is something of a potpourri article, I will add a little annoyance we faced today that dates back to Monday. Elizabeth and I assumed the garbage pickup would be delayed a day because of George Washington’s Birthday aka President’s Day. But we found out this morning — too late to do anything about it — that it wasn’t. Evidently Louisville considers the presidents less important to America than Martin Luther King, since they do honor Black Identity Politics Day. Unfortunately, wrapping my calves as a treatment for a skin problem creates a lot of trash. Going 2 weeks will be a strain. To be sure, we could have verified it, but it’s still annoying — and especially their priorities for vacation days.

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