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Author Topic: Slippery Goldberg
Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 17, 2018, 16:21
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I don't know who Goldberg is trying to imitate, John Steinbeck or Charles Kuralt, but he doesn't succeed in either case.

One of his more silly and disingenuous anti-Trump-supporter lines is:

I am stunned that so many people can simultaneously argue that Trump is a man of great character and that it is outrageous for me to suggest otherwise even though it doesn’t actually matter if he’s not a man of great character because character doesn’t matter, and yet I am a man of low character because I said character matters at a time when we’re at war, and saying “character matters” undermines Donald Trump even though character doesn’t matter and even if it did, he’s got character out the ying yang.

I must laugh at Goldberg's musings. It is exactly because people know who Trump is that they are not shocked by his morals. This was taken into consideration when they voted in November 2016.

How many politicians have "good character?" The job doesn't lend itself to such a thing. Of course, St. Just, Robespierre and Lenin were of the highest character. They were of such high character that they knew it was fine to dispose of those who disagreed with their goals, which were formulated with the highest interests of humanity in mind.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 17, 2018, 16:53
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One problem is that his political musings this time are hardly even coherent. It's hard to say what he's saying other than "Down with Trump", which is always part of them. I'm not sure how good those monsters were personally, but I do recall that Napoleon in Animal Farm was considered to have some sort of character advantage (I think it was "depth of character", whatever exactly that means) over Snowball.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 10:58
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How many politicians have "good character?" The job doesn't lend itself to such a thing.

Right you are, Mr. Kung. I didn’t read his travelogue entry but agree with Timothy, sight unseen, that he’s probably better at that. If so, I think it’s because he’s more genuine.

One of the difficult things is defining character. Do we really want nice-guy Romneys who will continue to bury us in debt, socialism, and political correctness? This is the “character” that surely Goldberg is talking about. We expect politicians to smile while screwing us.

Don’t get me wrong. I think Trump is of low character. But he’s no worse than these others and likely better than most. I guess at the end of the day, I’ll judge his character by his actions and policies, not his occasional offensive Tweet.

Goldberg and his ilk obsess over gentlemanly manners. I don't. Nor did the people who voted for Trump. Nor can anyone make a good argument that the well-mannered people have done squat to reverse the Leftist/socialist course we’re on now. Maybe Reagan. But it’s a short list.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 11:56
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Do we really want nice-guy Romneys who will continue to bury us in debt, socialism, and political correctness?

Since I was a teenager, my philosophy in these matters has been, "it takes a crook to deal with a crook." I am of the opinion that most politicians throughout the world and history have been crooks of one sort or another. Such people cannot be dealt with by using the Marquess of Queensberry Rules, as much as they like to pretend it.

The naive' and overly protected of society, particularly in America, have little idea of the machinations which our "Rulers" will use to continue in power. Generally, it takes being screwed by politicians for the civilian to attain some glimpse of how devious and unethical politicians truly are. As one woman, whose father worked in D.C. all his life, told me, "There are no Dudley-Do-Rights in Washington."

This being the case, I find Trump falls under a similar category as did Nixon. To wit "He may be a crook, but he's our crook." Reagan was something out of the normal in this regard as was the greatest many who every lived, i.e. George Washington. But as you can see, such types might appear every couple of hundred years, or so.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 12:35
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In the TV series of I, Claudius, when Tiberius finds out about Sejanus, Caligula points out the maxim, "Set a thief to catch a thief" and recommends using Sejanus's ambitious deputy, Macro, to dispose of him. I will also note that the first famous detective was probably Vidocq in Paris -- who knew the underworld well as a former crook himself. There's at least one novel about his doings as a detective, not to mention the Vidocq Society that investigates unsolved crimes.

Since Dudley Do-Right was a good-hearted incompetent, there probably are some of his ilk in DC, though probably even more bad-hearted incompetents.

After his election in 1888 (despite losing the popular vote), Benjamin Harrison thanked Providence for his victory. Roscoe Conkling objected, saying Harrison should know Providence had nothing to do with it, and concluding that Harrison "will never know how many people had to approach the shadow of the penitentiary" to elect him.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 14:09
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"it takes a crook to deal with a crook."

I guess we’re all hoping the Elliot Nesses of the world will step up and disprove that truism.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 14:42
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Sometimes they do. But then, Ness had nothing to do with the tax evasion case against Capone (that was a different Treasury office). One source I read says he was almost ready to make a massive Prohibition court case against Capone at the time, but another says his Untouchables didn't accomplish much. As Cleveland police chief, he failed to catch the Mad Butcher of Kingsbury Run in the later thirties. Serial killers can be hard to catch, which is why so many pile up such a large collection of victims.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 15:58
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but another says his Untouchables didn't accomplish much.

It is important to at least make a symbolic act against crime. I disagree with the weak libertarian argument that says that since you can’t eradicate all on one type of criminal behavior that therefore it is worse than useless to even try. It is harmful.

But giving criminals free rein is never a good idea….whether on the streets of Chicago or in the halls of Congress.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 16:06
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Or in the Catholic Church. Those deviant priests should have faced legal charges back when that was possible. Now it's too late, and the hierarchs responsible for that should be fired, excommunicated, and face any legal charges possible.

Also not on the southern border. I-10 was, and probably still is, considered risky in many parts of Arizona and New Mexico because of the invaders from Mexico and points south. But no one among the Demagogues cares because illegal aliens rank far higher than Americans on the identity group hierarchy, and too few among the Republicans because their corporate donors care more about getting cheap labor than about dead Americans.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Slippery Goldberg
on: August 20, 2018, 17:32
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To wit "He may be a crook, but he's our crook."

Most politicians would have the same philosophy as Fagin, i.e. "You've got to pick a pocket or two." The difference is poor old Fagin ended badly whereas most politicians end up lobbyists, university presidents or on the boards of large corporations. Oh, I forgot what most of them do, which is return to their original occupation being "schyster lawyers."

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