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Author Topic: Breaking History
Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 10, 2019, 17:56
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Mark Steyn's Sunday night music article covers a song with an interesting historical connection. "Cruising Down the River" was a favorite, during the grim spring/summer of 1948, aboard the HMS Amethyst trapped by Mao's forces on the Yangtze a hundred miles upstream from Shanghai. The ship had been damaged and was abandoned at one point -- but when the Chicoms opened fire on the fleeing crew, they went back aboard and repaired it enough to (eventually) escape to the sea. It's easy to see why that song title appealed to them.

Incidentally, the escape was the subject of C. E. Lucas Phillips's Escape of the Amethyst, He also did books about the raid on St. Nazaire as well as the cockleshell raid on Bordeaux. In addition, he wrote The Spanish Pimpernel about the Spanish Civil War heroics of Christopher Lance, rescuer of prisoners held by the Loyalist militias of Madrid. I read that once, and also his book on the Amethyst's escape down the Yangtze. Steyn devotes about half the article to the escape. The link is:

https://www.steynonline.com/9240/cruising-down-the-river

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 13, 2019, 07:53
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On March 13, 1881, the People's Will (a tiny group of revolutionary students) finally succeeded in assassinating Tsar Alexander II, the great reformer who had ended serfdom. Their earlier attempts had caused him to pull back on his many reforms, but he finally decided to restart them, including moving Russia toward a constitutional monarchy. The assassination aborted this. To revolutionaries, gradual reform is undesirable because it makes revolution less likely. It betters the lot of the people, but revolutionaries don't actually care about that.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 15, 2019, 07:58
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Today, of course, is the Ides of March, famous as the day Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC. I saw suggestions last night that Heinrich Mueller might issue his report today, perhaps hoping to do figuratively what the 8 assassins did literally. He might want to remember that it didn't work out well for them in the end.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 15, 2019, 08:23
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So...I wonder who was the whistle-blower warning Caesar about the Deep State?

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 15, 2019, 08:56
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Some soothsayer. I don't recall if either Plutarch or Shakespeare named him. But of course his source of knowledge would theoretically have been mystical, probably from taking auspices, not a leak from Brutus.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 15, 2019, 09:21
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Pan?

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 15, 2019, 09:34
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Pan was a minor god, famous at least in Athens for somehow terrifying the Persians at Marathon (hence panic).

Incidentally, they missed a bet at lunch today. It would be so appropriate to serve a Caesar salad on March 15. Well, there's always dinner, though I wouldn't bet on it.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 15, 2019, 20:07
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My friend Joseph Major, who has appeared here once or twice, reports that the haruspex who warned Gaius Julius Caesar to beware the Ides of March was an Etruscan named Spurinna. It's referenced in wikipedia, though without an actual article about him.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: March 18, 2019, 08:02
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Today is an anniversary of moderate importance in American history. On March 18, 1766, Britain canceled the Stamp Act, which in fact had never been enforced in America. Interestingly, Ben Franklin's initial reaction was to apply to be one of the commissioners. Then came the uproar over it, and he went to Britain to explain what was wrong with it. (I actually read some of his testimony to Parliament in a biography of Franklin.) He stayed quite a while, and as best I recall never saw his common-law wife again. (They never formally married because her first husband had gone away and she had no idea whether or not he was alive. Anti-bigamy laws were very strict back then.)

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