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Author Topic: Breaking History
Timothy-
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 15, 2018, 09:18
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And so is December 15, and not just because my Aunt Erma was born this day many years ago (she died about a quarter century ago). On December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights took effect. Important as the Constitution in general is, the Bill of Rights is what makes us free (and still largely does despite leftist hostility to it). More shame to James Madison for not realizing its importance at first.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 16, 2018, 16:12
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Another day for the founders. On December 16, 1773, occasional brewer Samuel Adams led a crowd of fake Mohawk Indians (apparently pretending to be Indian is an old Taxachusetts tradition) to toss overboard a shipment of tea as a protest of the tea tax. This led to a number of parliamentary punishments of Boston, known as the Coercive Acts to the Brits and the Intolerable Acts to Americans.

It also led to leftists ignorant of history mocking Sarah Palin in 2010 for saying before the elections that it wasn't yet time to party as if it were 1773. They foolishly thought she didn't know what she was talking about.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 20, 2018, 07:33
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Going back to the Founders again, on December 20, 1803, the United States took formal possession of the Louisiana Purchase. This can truly be considered the beginning of Manifest Destiny. And the biggest challenge to that may have begun on December 20, 1860, when South Carolina seceded from the United States. This ultimately began our nation's greatest crisis yet, though it was nearly 3 weeks before another state joined South Carolina.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 26, 2018, 07:44
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On December 26, 1776, George Washington defeated the Hessians at Trenton, a remarkable victory that can reasonably be considered the first major turning point of the Revolutionary War. It initiated a short campaign that would result in another important victory at Princeton a few days later, and would also recover virtually the whole of New Jersey from the British. William R. Forstchen and Newt Gingrich wrote a historical novel on the subject, the first of a trilogy on the war (the second involves Valley Forge, von Steuben, and Monmouth; the third deals with Yorktown).

In view of a previous discussion on another thread here, it's worth noting that on December 26, 1898, Marie and Pierre Curie discovered radium (having previously discovered polonium).

Timothy-
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: January 3, 2019, 08:21
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Following up on the last entry, on January 3, 1777, George Wasington capped his New Jersey campaign. After facing Lord Cornwallis on Assunpink Creek just south of Trenton the day before (repelling several efforts to cross the creek), Washington slipped away and moved to Princeton without Cornwallis realizing he had left, then attacked and captured 3 British regiments. There were a few further relatively bloodless confrontations with Cornwallis before the British pulled back to the New York area, abandoning most of New Jersey, and Washington took up winter quarters in Morristown.

Also, much later, construction on the Brooklyn Bridge began on January 3, 1869. August Roebling built it to be 6 times as strong as necessary, though cheap cables by a corrupt contractor left it (in his computation) only 4 times as strong as needed. It's still standing 120 years later. That wasn't the only corrupt aspect of its construction, since it started when William Marcy Tweed was Mayor of New York City. Later some conmen would actually scam tourists and such by "selling" the bridge.

And this is also J. R. R. Tolkien's birthday. A Great War survivor, he became a noted scholar of medieval literature (he was a translator of "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", though I have no idea if his was the version we read in the 12th grade) and languages (one of the Elvish languages was based on Finnish) who then struck lightning in a bottle when he decided to apply his talents to writing his own fiction.

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