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Author Topic: Breaking History
Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 7, 2018, 14:45
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You can see part of the Changi Airport runway when you pan out, but when I first moved to Singapore there was no Changi Airport.

If you compare the Google map to the map in the video, it looks as if there has been a large section of landfill to the east (and east of the airport).

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 7, 2018, 14:48
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Given the expense of the guns, and the rarity of their use, Hanson considered them a waste in The Second World Wars.

Big guns like that are a guy thing . . . just like vagina hats are a girl thing (if they still qualify as women).

Timothy-
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 7, 2018, 14:58
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Well, it takes a big gun to harm a battleship. Thirty inches is more than necessary, but Hitler had a fetish for bigness -- in weapons and architecture. The weapons included the Maus, 150 or more tons with a turret as heavy as a Panther tank, and proposals as large as a thousand-ton land battleship. The Japanese similarly built the 3 largest warships in the world (until the Forrestal was built), the battleships Yamato and Musashi and their sister ship, converted to an aircraft carrier, Shinano. Speer in his memoirs discussed Hitler's desire for super-large buildings in his proposed reconstruction of Berlin.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 7, 2018, 16:01
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Speer in his memoirs discussed Hitler's desire for super-large buildings in his proposed reconstruction of Berlin.

I believe Hitler had planned to build one domed building based on the Pantheon was to be so large that it would have had its own microclimate inside. Berlin would have sure looked different had Hitler won the war.

Here are the big guns I believe Tim was mentioning.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwerer_Gustav

They would have been better building more smaller guns.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 7, 2018, 16:09
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If you compare the Google map to the map in the video, it looks as if there has been a large section of landfill to the east (and east of the airport).

Due to land reclamation, Singapore is substantially larger today than when I first moved there in late 1979.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 7, 2018, 16:33
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The problem for Germany was that its resources were severely limited. The US could have found a potential use for Gustav and Dora; they were useful at Sevastapol. But Germany didn't have the wealth and metals for 2 guns used so little. It was much like their other gigantic weapons -- they could have built at least 6 Panthers instead of the 2 prototypes of the Maus, which never really accomplished anything. Even the gargantuan Jagdtiger with its 128/55 gun was far more practical. (One wargaming magazine, discussing various Soviet and German units from the Panzerblitz game included the main threat to each. For the Jagdtiger, this was "Small mammals that eat the eggs?")

Speer didn't so much criticize the individual buildings in the Berlin plan, but rather the lack of contrast. Everything was to be supersized.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 13, 2018, 15:32
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Today is the anniversary of Ambrose Burnside's attacks at Fredericksburg in 1862. Apparently Burnside wanted to strike hard at the Confederate right flank, under Stonewall Jackson, while striking Longstreet on Marye's Heights presumably to hold him in place. Instead, William B. Franklin sent 2 divisions (neither from his corps) to attack Jackson (another was occupied trying to figure out what to to by a flanking artillery battery under John Pelham). They penetrated the front line in a boggy opening, only to be pushed back by the sort of reserves Jackson rarely had available. Edwin V. Sumner, on the other flank, sent several corps against Longstreet -- one division at a time against a very strong position. None of them ever even reached the Confederate front line. Even so, 2 of the Confederate brigade commanders were hit during the attacks -- Tom Cobb was killed and John R. Cooke severely wounded.

Overall losses were a little over 12,600 for the Yanks and (officially) 5300 or so for Lee. According to Douglas Southall Freeman in Lee's Lieutenants (my father had a set, much of which I read when I was young), a more accurate figure was about 4200, the rest being very lightly wounded but eager for a Christmas furlough. The loss rate was especially unfavorable (about 4-1 or worse) opposite Marye's Heights.

This was a typical Confederate defensive victory. Very impressive, but the Union could actually afford the losses better than Lee's men could. Because of strong Union artillery on Stafford Heights across the river, Lee decided that he couldn't risk an assault to try to destroy Burnside after the repulse.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 14, 2018, 11:51
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George Washington died on this day in 1799. He was 67 years old. Without his leadership, the U.S.A. would never have existed.

"Light-Horse" Harry Lee eulogized Washington as, "First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen."

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 14, 2018, 12:09
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I usually don't bother with listing who died on a given date because so many important people have died (or been born). But it's true that without Washington we probably couldn't have achieved independence, and even if we had most likely it would have been a very different America -- not the long time exemplar of freedom. Even now, with all that the left has done to convert America to a typical European socialist Behemoth, we still have most of the Bill of Rights.

And Henry Lee, of course, was the scapegrace father of Robert E. Lee, who once edited his father's memoir of the war in the south during the American Revolution -- and added a short bio of the writer. It should come as no surprise that I had a copy before we had to leave nearly everything behind in our house. He gets mentioned (anachronistically as "General Light-Horse Harry Lee") in "The Lees of Old Virginia", sung by Richard Henry Lee in the musical 1776. (Washington never appears in the musical, but his letters to Congress do.)

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Breaking History
on: December 14, 2018, 12:24
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December 14 is indeed an important day to commemorate.

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