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Author Topic: Biblical history
Timothy-
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Post Biblical history
on: July 6, 2018, 12:36
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There's an interesting article at Town Hall Finance dealing with the ancient history of Galilee. It seems that after the '60s, the fascination with Fidel, Che, Mao, and the murderous revolutions they led caught on in Biblical scholarship as well as many other places. So a bunch of Bible scholars decided that Galilee was full of wandering poor people waiting for a revolutionary to lead them. The evidence for this, of course, was that it fit their ideological image. And it made for a revolutionary Jesus, no doubt in order to justify the Maryknollers and the religion of social justice warfare.

More recently, people have looked at actual evidence, such as the remains found in various digs. The result seems to be that while Galilee had the usual supply of poor people, it was relatively prosperous for a backwater. No doubt this surprises a lot of academics, at least those capable of accepting evidence contrary to their ideology. The link is:

https://finance.townhall.com/columnists/jerrybowyer/2018/07/06/what-kind-of-economy-did-galilee-have-was-it-poor-n2497903?utm_source=thdaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nl

Timothy-
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Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 6, 2018, 22:19
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An interesting example of the use of biblical knowledge came in late 1917. A British commander in Palestine came upon a town called Mukhmas. This sounded vaguely familiar, so he checked his Bible concordance and found the name "Michmash". It was the site of a victory by the Israelites over the Philistines using a surprise raid. The officer thought that what worked 3000 years ago might work now, and successfully used the same tactic in the same place to defeat the Ottoman forces there.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 7, 2018, 11:49
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And it made for a revolutionary Jesus,

Jesus is already a revolutionary notion/figure. He transcends mere economics, but does not exclude them. You’re certainly right about people trying to fit things into their ideological image. (Frankly, I’m still having a hard time squeezing Trump into my ideological image. Others have had a much easier time of it.)

What I contend is that brotherly love is a part of our earthly goal. Infused with love of God, we can hardly hate another (as a matter of course, not as a matter of self defense). What I also contend is that it is not easy under the best of circumstances. That said, making an idol out of “the poor” is not what I think Jesus had in mind. I think bloated virtue signaling will also have trouble threading through the eye of that needle.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 7, 2018, 11:59
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Jesus is revolutionary in his way, but not in the Maryknoller sense. "Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's" is hardly a call for revolt (as the revolting left prefers). Charles I used it against the Roundheads when they tried him as he mocked their most unholy rebellion.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 7, 2018, 12:13
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"Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's"

As I understand it, Jesus said a lot of things in the context of the Romans and Pharisees trying to play “gotcha” with him. I would seriously doubt that Jesus would support freely giving to Stalin or Hitler just because they were the head of government.

I think when it says in John that we must be “born again,” it doesn’t mean being born into an obnoxious, self-righteous body or one that would please Karl Marx.

One thing about artists (the field intersects my general profession) is that they notice with eyes of wonder (or at least discerning interest) things that you and I (and most others) take for granted. Life for most becomes a habit. I think the “born again” aspect means to adopt an entirely new way of looking at things. There are (shock of shocks) other metrics than economics.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 7, 2018, 12:31
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I don't know if the TV episode covers this, but the Father Brown story "The Mirror of the Magistrate" goes into the mindset of an artist or poet (I don't remember which, but it probably makes little difference). The murder suspect is one, and Father Brown thinks that the authorities (including his defense lawyer) simply don't understand him, such as why he would climb into a tree or follow a path going nowhere.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 7, 2018, 21:24
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I don't recall that plot in any of the 1974 episodes with Kenneth More.

Without art, we are dead. Sort of like science without religion is lame. There's a reason that silence and prayer are avenues for reaching out to God. It's because we first have to get beyond the blather in our own heads as well as our one-track ego that cares (these days) only for immediate gratification.

Not that artists aren't egotistical. They are probably the worst. But good ones (not the faux artists we see forwarding Marxist junk as art) tap into something. Tapping into something beyond ourselves (and I don't mean charismatic leaders) is essential for moving from "animal-like to the God-like"

Timothy-
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Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 7, 2018, 21:55
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"The Mirror of the Magistrate" was the sixth episode listed. It's possible that they didn't include that aspect, which is peripheral to the plot. (Father Brown solves the case by pointing out who the murderer had to resemble -- which did not include the poet, or the judge's servant, or the oddly-behaving neighbor. But it did include the prosecutor who was pursuing the case against the poet rather vindictively.

I once read an SF story about some future war between Earth and aliens. Earth was fighting to preserve its culture, but was so mobilized that everyone had to do practical war work. When the time came that a poet was needed, no one was available.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Biblical history
on: July 8, 2018, 09:50
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Okay. Yeah. The Kenneth More version had that episode. I had finally finished those and they did not get better as the series wore on. Oh well. But that series is definitely a watchable oddity for the first few.

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