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Author Topic: Turner Classic Movies
Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: February 24, 2019, 10:44
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Still on my bucket list is The Music Man. Haven't found it for free anywhere yet. But I may spring for it on VUDU.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 2, 2019, 07:51
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Today TCM starts with a lot of science fiction. The Time Machine is on now, followed by Forbidden Planet at noon, Them! at 2 p.m., Destination Moon (which is the one I'm likeliest to see, never having done so previously -- and it was written by Robert Heinlein) at 3:45, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind at 5:30. All times EST, of course.

After that, they go with Dustin Hoffmann movies, starting with Tootsie at 8 p.m., then Victor/Victoria, and finally The Graduate.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 2, 2019, 09:28
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I mentioned here lately that I watched The Time Machine. I had noted that, for some reason, it’s the best I’d ever seen it. Once in a while even a well-viewed movie will hit you that way.

I’ve got Forbidden Planet on Blu-ray. That’s how much I like it. It’s still difficult not to chuckle at Leslie Nielsen. Yes, I know this is a completely straight role for him. But his subsequent work in the 80’s and 90’s have broken that old Quinn Martin cop-show persona.

But he’s terrific in this. And according to a blurb at IMDB, this is truly one of the most important sci-films of all time:

This film marked one of the first times a science-fiction project had received a large budget. The genre had rarely been taken seriously by studio executives, and sci-fi films generally received the most meager of budgets. The critical success of this film convinced many in the film industry that well-funded science-fiction projects could be successful. Film historian Ben Mankiewicz has claimed that this film's success made future big-budget science-fiction films possible.

Love this bit of trivia as well:

Star Trek (1966) creator Gene Roddenberry has been quoted as saying that this film was a major inspiration for that series. Perhaps not accidentally, Warren Stevens, who plays "Doc" here, would later be a guest star in 1968's Star Trek: By Any Other Name (1968), where the true shape of the alien Kelvans, like the Krell in this movie, was implied to be extremely non-humanoid but never shown. 1701, which is the serial number of the Starship Enterprise, allegedly comes from the clock mark 17:01 when the C57D enters orbit around Altair IV.

Here’s a bit of trivia I really didn’t need to know about one of my favorite movies. But it’s funny all the same:

This movie was filmed on the same stage on which The Wizard of Oz (1939) had been filmed 17 years earlier; the set of Altaira's garden is a reuse of the Munchkin Village set from "The Wizard of Oz”.

Ding dong, the ID is dead?

Timothy-
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Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 2, 2019, 14:42
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Well, I just finished Destination Moon. It's a nice movie, and influential in the development of the field. George Pal was a friend of Walter Lanz, so the scientific explanation (delivered to a group of businessmen whose support was being solicited) comes in the form of a Woody Woodpecker cartoon. It also uses an excellent analogy for the rocket by comparing it to the recoil of a shotgun. Of course, rockets (and jets, which use the same reaction but unlike rockets rely on air-breathing engines) were already very familiar from World War II. But a lot of people probably didn't realize that they could work even in a vacuum.

Pal often made Woody Woodpecker references in his movies, and it would be interesting to find them in much the same way one locates Alfred Hitchcock's cameos in (most of) his movies. The article on this mentioned that in The Time Machine a girl in the 1966 section, when the nuclear alert sounds, drops a Woody Woodpecker doll.

Another interesting segment comes late in the movie, when it turns out they don't have enough reaction mass to get back and land. They start tossing out unnecessary equipment, which gets them most of the way there. It looks like they might have to leave someone behind until they decide to leave their space suits (which won't be necessary if they don't have to leave the ship before landing on Earth) and radio (they could be tracked on Earth by radar). Was this an answer to "The Cold Equations"? Well, the story itself came out later, but similar plots had already appeared, one of them in 1949 -- the year before Destination Moon came out.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 13, 2019, 07:58
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TCM has some interesting movies today. The Charge of the Light Brigade is on at 1:45 pm EDT. My main problem with the movie is that it has almost nothing to do with the actual event, not even the names of the major participants (unlike, say, Zulu). George MacDonald Fraser did like one of these aspects: the sepoy result at the beginning was effectively a recreation of the massacre at Cawnpore that began the great sepoy mutiny in 1859, 5 years after the Battle of Balaclava.

In addition, at 9:45 pm they have Hawaii, based on the first part of James Michener's book.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 13, 2019, 09:24
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“Hawaii” intrigues me. I read Michener’s “Tales of the South Pacific” and really liked it. I started reading another of his books, “Centennial,” and it started with a concocted, ham-fisted story about dinosaurs. I left it after about 15 pages.

The 1966 movie isn’t rated all that well (6.6). I guess my expectations would be very low. Reviews suggest that Julie Andrews is good but Max von Sydow as her bible-thumping missionary husband is a bit one-dimensional and uninteresting.

One reviewer writes:

"hawaii" accurately describes the decimation of islands' tribal system by the onslaught of forced christianity.

if you're "offended as a christian" at this movie, you might want to question the virtues of selling or otherwise pushing a mythology on a society that's already had one for ages.

Skimming over the fact that many of these tribal cultures were in need of saving, you see an example of the thorough indoctrination that has been done to The Smart People. They now arguably believe a dogma far more expansive and intrusive than Christianity could ever think of being (Leftism) but it’s always the other guy who’s fallen for his religion and needs to stifle it.

When you see child sacrifice, squalid conditions, a lack of an kind of justice, and just ignorance round and round (whether in Hawaii or elsewhere), I think instead of blaming the Christian missionaries for trying the help we ought to thank them. You can re-define squalid as “true to their culture,” but squalid is still squalid, no matter how much we want to normalize squalid because we think we are being “sensitive.”

Let’s assume this reviewer is a staunch conservative, because he or she also writes:

but one of the main points, especially with the character hale, is that people should have better priorities about themselves, such as mastering and resolving their own lives, sooner than worrying over, or assuming responsiblity for other people's dogmatic inclinations.

If you mean that AOC and other evil socialist cranks ought to first resolve their own phobias and psychoses before venturing out into the world, I quite agree.

It's ironic, because normal and descent people in America find themselves to be the native Hawaiians to whom this next quote by the same reviewer fits:

yes, this story states point blank that christian missionaries did their best to destroy hawaii's native beliefs, traditions, et cetera; and yes, it happened. it's also an accurate history-based depiction of events neither any of you nor i are held responsible.

That is exactly what the Left is doing. They are doing their utmost to destroy our traditions and beliefs. If, however, this reviewer is aware of this and sides with me, then hallelujah. But I severely doubt it.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 13, 2019, 09:54
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Although Hale is hardly the hero of the movie, it's worth noting that it ends when he meets an adult Hawaiian who, earlier, had been marked for death (I don't recall why) and whom Hale had saved. We saw this as a family, and I recall my mother (who had read the novel and commented on the difference) noting that point. I later read the book myself, as well as a lot of other Michener books (including Centennial).

Naturally, the first Michener book I ever read was Our Presidential Lottery. Although Michener was a liberal for most of his life (though a Republican during World War II, supporting Dewey in 1944), it's quite interesting.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 13, 2019, 10:29
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I saw "Hawaii" when it first came out and the thing that amazed me as a thirteen-year-old boy was the way the movie showed Hawaiian women going around topless. In 1966 this was way out there.

As to the the decimation of islands' tribal system by the onslaught of forced christianity. Do you think the commenter does not know English grammar or is trying to show his disdain for Christianity by not capitalizing the word?

I don't recall Christianity was necessarily forced on the natives. I seem to recall that one way it was done was by convincing some of the ruling class to convert and the rest would follow. I believe one young man of the royal family converted and then renounced Christianity just before dying of some disease (measles?) which Westerners had brought with them and for which the natives had no immunity.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 13, 2019, 11:09
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Note that the plot starts when a native who, I believe, has adopted Christianity asks for missionaries to Hawaii. They come in response to his request.

We saw the movie when it came out, and I don't recall being shocked or particularly reacting to topless native women. I was a bit older, which may have been part of the different response. I may also simply have expected that sort of thing from native women.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Turner Classic Movies
on: March 13, 2019, 12:35
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I saw "Hawaii" when it first came out and the thing that amazed me as a thirteen-year-old boy was the way the movie showed Hawaiian women going around topless. In 1966 this was way out there.

Well, okay. I can sit through some boring Max von Sydow stuff for that.

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