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Author Topic: Netflix
Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Netflix
on: July 2, 2018, 11:59
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I hope to be canceling Netflix in the near future. For now, I’ll start this forum topic as a catch-all for reviews of Neftlix shows, particularly their “originals.” (“Original” can mean as little as simply picking up the rights to some show produced and broadcast completely independently in Norway.)

Anyway, I binge-watched a Netflix Original series called The Forest. It’s a Frenchy series. Actually, Samuel Labarthe (the last masculine-looking man in France) is pretty good in his understated role as the head cop, Gaspard Decker. I’d like to see him in some more stuff. He has a lead part in Les petits meurtres d'Agatha Christie which could be interesting.

A girl’s body is found in “La forêt”. Her two chick best friends are also acting suspiciously. I’ll give you a spoiler at the end because I don’t think one really watches this kind of show for the who-done-it value. You watch as you would Mystery Science Theatre 3000. You watch as these formulaic characters dutifully do their formulaic stuff — much of it completely dumb and reckless.

In an overall way, this series reminded me of “Broadchurch,” particularly the lead chick cop who should have been fired three times over. Suzzane Clement is terrific in the role. Just top-notch acting. But it is top-notch acting of a hysterical female who should nowhere be near a badge or gun. But that’s part of the fun.

Alexia Barlier is good a Eve Mendel, the wild-child survivor who was found in the woods and raised by a decent man. (But, of course, you know everyone is a potential suspect.)

This is a series that is binge-watchable with a grain of salt. If you can’t find entertainment value in some of the stupider elements and have no internal sense of humor about such things, then this might not be for you. But, oh goodness, what a social commentary this inadvertently is on feminism.

Now I’m going to give you a real big spoiler so don’t read on if you want to watch this from scratch. My guess on what these girls were up to was that they had some kind of lesbian-witch-prostitution-drug ring going deep in La foret. That certainly was a catch-all idea, but with the early setting of the ominous woods (the Ardenne Forest), it fit.

But specifically this was about these girls selling their virginity to the highest bidder on some web set. And when push comes to shove, this storyline basically had little do with the murders. But like I said, you have to have a sense of humor about modern schlock. Fortunately I do to some extent.

The real murderer’s motives were blurry and unknown. When you get to the end of it it isn’t a letdown, per se, as much as it seems the culmination of second-rate writing with some (in places) first-rate acting along with some very nice cinematography. No one watching this series could have possibly expected it would be wrapped up smartly, and it wasn’t, although there is satisfying completion to the Eve Mendel (former wild child) story.

All the women in this are annoying, reckless, stupid, and then surprised when they get into trouble. Like I said, a certain perspective or sense of humor helps to enjoy this.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Netflix
on: July 2, 2018, 12:21
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If this effectively mocks feminism, then this probably means that the people who did it are so out of touch with reality that they can't see their own foibles. But then, this seems to be quite common among leftists. The Ardennes is where the German Schwerpunkt came in 1940 (and they attacked, with much less success, in December 1944). They also successfully pushed through there in 1914.

I've found it difficult to do a circumflex. It's a matter of spelling; I know "uml" for umlaut, "grave" and "acute" for the other accents, and "tilde". But I don't know the circumflex or the cedilla (or, for that matter, the sort of bottom cedilla and upside-down circumflex you get in Slavic languages).

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Netflix
on: July 2, 2018, 12:52
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If this effectively mocks feminism, then this probably means that the people who did it are so out of touch with reality that they can't see their own foibles.

Yes, this is where one can find great entertainment value. You can be pretty sure that the writers are so ensconced in feminism that they have no idea that they’re making these women look petty, stupid, and dumb. I doubt any of these writers are self-consciously poking fun at feminism, particularly the idea that a woman, no matter how young, should be able to do what she wants with no consequences.

And yet who knows? Certainly the head cop (who is older than the rest), Gaspard Decker, comes off as cool-headed, professional, and honest while the rest of those around him you have to wonder what affirmative action program made cops out of them. Virginie Musso is laughably incompetent while the fat underling (I forget his name) is a bench-warmer all the way.

It’s funny too (very similar to “Broadchurch”) that cop sidekick Virginie Musso has an emasculated husband who is a stay-at-home caretaker of the children. And this husband is involved in the whole sexual mess (as in “Broadchurch”) and his wife (the cop…as in “Broadchurch”) does so much unprofessional stuff that any court case would easily be thrown out.

Suffice it to say, that marriage does not last. This is actually two stories in one intermingled. Eve Mendel (who spent two years living in the wild) is looking for her roots. And there are clues from the murder that she is somehow (innocently) connected to similar murders that happened twenty years ago. Although not flamboyant as an actress, I think she establishes herself in the role.

The three bad-girl chicks are hilariously stupid. The one (who gets murdered) we don’t see much of. The other two — particularly the daughter of bad-boy father, Thierry Rouget — are doing all they can possibly do to be raped and murdered. What will their outcome be while the police look for the killer of their murdered friend? At one point, you begin rooting for the killer which gives you an idea of how idiotic these chicks are.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 08:48
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There was a short piece today at patriotpost on what Netflix is doing with Anne of Green Gables. I never read the original book, but it came out over a century ago and probably didn't push a homosexual agenda. But Netflix has decided to do so now. The link is:

https://patriotpost.us/articles/57627?mailing_id=3677&utm_medium=email&utm_source=pp.email.3677&utm_campaign=snapshot&utm_content=body

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 11:05
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By sheer coincidence, I watched the first episode of that two days ago. Anne is an obnoxious and talkative child. I couldn’t tell at the time where they were going with that. There was some good interplay between her and her distinctly non-talkative foster father when he first picked her up from the train station. Anne was supposed to be talkative and obnoxious. It’s just unclear if that is her one and only shtick. If so, this will get old very fast.

But I had no idea they were going in the direction that they apparently are. I’ll watch episode two and report back.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 15:55
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I watched a little more of episode one of “Anne with an E.” There’s nothing here so far that stands out in terms of Saul Alinsky. Granted, I have no idea of the original story. And it must be said that just as Huckleberry Finn is a throughly boy’s story, so “Anne of Green Gables” might be one for little girls. I suspect this is so.

So I don’t automatically mark it down for the feminist aspect as this little girl reminds us that girls can do anything boys can. (Try pissing standing up.) Maybe this is in the original book. Maybe it’s not. But what we have is the story of a little girl who just won’t shut the hell up. She talks non-stop. I get that they’re trying to make her preconscious and a highly “creative” type. But it’s a little over-the-top.

Still, the story in the first hour isn’t a bad one: An old maid and her old master brother (neither have been married) have sent to the asylum for a boy to help out on the farm. They get a girl instead. Anne is 150% excited (make that 175%….maybe more) to have a chance to live somewhere nice where she can (in her own words) be a child for the first time in her life. Her parents died from some illness when she was three months old. Ever since then she’s been passed around where she has always had to justify herself by being useful.

Some overwrought flashbacks are paired with what could be called over-acting by Amybeth McNulty. She lays it on so thick it makes it difficult to like the child or find her charming. Still, you do find sympathy for her when Marilla Cuthbert sticks to her guns and tells Anne that a mistake was made and she must return to the asylum. Marilla is determined to get the farmhand boy she initially asked for.

Meanwhile, her brother, Matthew, has warmed to the little girl. I think much of this is an idea we clearly see rather than the execution of it. Anne is so grating that it’s difficult to believe that even the reserved and kindly Matthew would be taken with her for no reason at all. Anne’s charm stems less from being a precocious, well-meaning child and more from analogously sticking your finger in a lightbulb socket.

Still, as you might guess, Marilla warms to her a bit, especially after she learns what the alternative for Anne would be. She decides on a five-day trial for Anne. And that’s about where I left it. And I’ll get to the second episode and check out the homosexual and other gender-bending-friendly aspect of it if this child will just shut the hell up for five minutes so I can make it to the next episode.

Yes, at times it’s that bad.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 16:26
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I decided to check on wikipedia, and it's clear from several references that Anne was rather talkative in the books, though evidently not to the degree she is on this series (produced by CBC). It refers to her talkativeness as a bright spot in life at Green Gables. Judging from the brief episode descriptions, the episode in question is #7 of the second season. The discussion on themes for the series mentions Anne as a proto-feminist, which doesn't seem to match the original series (where she later marries her initial bête noire, Gilbert).

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 19:13
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Oh goodness yes. She is definitely a proto-feminist. She’s a proto ball-buster. That comes through clear already.

Timothy-
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Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 19:34
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And that apparently is the 2017 Anne, not the 1908 Anne. She became an accomplished person, and some would say that makes her ultimately quietly feminist, but not in the modern sense. Christina Hoff Sommers divided feminists into equity feminists (who simply want equality, especially of opportunity, for women) and gender feminists (the man-hating lesbians and their allies). In 1978, the feminists had some sort of conference in which they found themselves forced to choose whether to ally with sympathetic men or with the man-haters. They chose the latter, which is why most women today rightly don't consider themselves feminists.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: Netflix
on: August 14, 2018, 23:02
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Looking ahead at some of the reviews of that series, I think I'll stop one hour into the first episode while I'm still ahead.

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