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Author Topic: BritBox
Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 10:32
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The book was set in 1963-4, ending at the Republican convention. Farm subsidies were certainly important then -- my grandfather made extensive use of them at Shady Lane Farm. (It was named after my father's West Point nickname.)

One of the crucial bad SCOTUS decisions was Wickard v. Filburn, which approved the second AAA on the basis of the government's power to regulate interstate commerce even though in that case, the farmer used the extra grain to feed his own animals.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 10:32
Quote

The book was set in 1963-4, ending at the Republican convention. Farm subsidies were certainly important then -- my grandfather made extensive use of them at Shady Lane Farm. (It was named after my father's West Point nickname.)

One of the crucial bad SCOTUS decisions was Wickard v. Filburn, which approved the second AAA on the basis of the government's power to regulate interstate commerce even though in that case, the farmer used the extra grain to feed his own animals.

Kung Fu Zu
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Kung Fu Zu
Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 10:48
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The book was set in 1963-4, ending at the Republican convention. Farm subsidies were certainly important then -- my grandfather made extensive use of them at Shady Lane Farm.

That was my point. Prior to farm subsidies, farmers were required to face reality in a way pretty much unknown after subsidies became widespread. As Brad wrote:

People who live in the country have to deal with reality on a more one-to-one basis. Whatever they may lack in appreciation for the fine arts they tend to more than make up for by not being complete dipsticks.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 10:54
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Holmes's point wasn't so much that people in the country are worse than people in the cities, but rather that evil is easier to hide when there's no one nearby.

Maybe. But the implication was clearly that any idea of the bucolic life of the countryside was a fraud. Here’s the passage from the story:

“Do you know, Watson,” said he, “that it is one of the curses of a mind with a turn like mine that I must look at everything with reference to my own special subject. You look at these scattered houses, and you are impressed by their beauty. I look at them, and the only thought which comes to me is a feeling of their isolation and of the impunity with which crime may be committed there.”

“Good heavens!” I cried. “Who would associate crime with these dear old homesteads?”

“They always fill me with a certain horror. It is my belief, Watson, founded upon my experience, that the lowest and vilest alleys in London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.”

“You horrify me!”

“But the reason is very obvious. The pressure of public opinion can do in the town what the law cannot accomplish. There is no lane so vile that the scream of a tortured child, or the thud of a drunkard’s blow, does not beget sympathy and indignation among the neighbours, and then the whole machinery of justice is ever so close that a word of complaint can set it going, and there is but a step between the crime and the dock. But look at these lonely houses, each in its own fields, filled for the most part with poor ignorant folk who know little of the law. Think of the deeds of hellish cruelty, the hidden wickedness which may go on, year in, year out, in such places, and none the wiser. Had this lady who appeals to us for help gone to live in Winchester, I should never have had a fear for her. It is the five miles of country which makes the danger. Still, it is clear that she is not personally threatened.”

This is a great expose on the mindset of Holmes. Whether or not this is anything more than a rhetorical argument, I don’t know. I suspect that wife-beaters as easily survive unknown and unchallenged in the city as in the country. A plausible argument can be made that cities are the worse for such things. We know today without a doubt that city dwellers (the same, it must be said, for suburban dwellers) tend to know little about their neighbors, or want to.

I like this passage. I’m just calling bullshit on it. Conan Doyle's idea that urban crimes tend to get reported because there are so many neighbors at hand does not match reality. City dwellers are well known for scores of them watching from their windows as a man is beaten to death and doing nothing about it.

And the country has no dark alleys to hide in. Cities are full of them. Cities make it far easier to hide vile acts and persons.

Timothy-
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Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 10:57
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Yes, I figured that's what you meant, but wasn't entirely sure.

Farmers also face certain other realities, such as the effects of climate (they have to decide when to plant, which is based primarily on what they expect the weather to be like). And the subsidies only apply to a small number of crops, or this is what they traditionally have been. Fruits and vegetables mostly were unsubsidized.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 11:08
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And the subsidies only apply to a small number of crops, or this is what they traditionally have been.

We need not pussy-foot (as you have not) around this fact. Anyone can be subverted and corrupted by “free stuff.” Farmers can be bought off as a constituency just as easily as urban blacks. That farmers call themselves “conservative” is a fine thing. But I’m not sure it’s an accurate thing anymore. The only conservative I know (including myself) is Pat. He probably actually would take a bullet for his country. He probably actually would starve instead of taking a handout from the government.

Such types are now all but extinct. Now “conservatism” is a vanity, a lightweight identity. But being pro-gun and anti-abortion in no way fixes all the big government stuff (and Leftist ideas) that most conservatives support in substantial ways.

I’d love to be governor of California right now because I’d be supporting farmers in a big way: Eradication of all illegal aliens who are turning the countryside into a shambles and proper management of water (instead of just dumping it into the ocean). I’m very much pro-farmer. But I’m anti-BS as well. And crop subsidies have become another horrible entitlement.

Timothy-
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Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 11:16
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Years ago, I read a true crime work (A Dark and Bloody Ground by Darcy O'Brien) which was set in the Cumberland Plateau, a poor area that featured much the same pathologies as in urban ghettos. Yet the demographics were the opposite -- white instead of black, rural instead of urban, Republicans instead of Demagogues. Only the poverty and related problems were the same, and of course were the cause of the pathologies.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: BritBox
on: March 8, 2019, 12:44
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Yet the demographics were the opposite -- white instead of black, rural instead of urban, Republicans instead of Demagogues. Only the poverty and related problems were the same, and of course were the cause of the pathologies.

I don’t pretend to be an expert, but I think we’ve all heard about some of the truly bleak-class poor in the Appalachian regions (Cumberland Plateau, for example) and such. Living a life of degradation knows no color boundaries.

This is a perfect example to talk about the size and proper role of government. People ought to be free to live a life of degradation for themselves — but that should not exempt them from providing a safe home, good food, and good education for their children. When they don’t, the state should step in.

On the other end of the spectrum, in the name of “help,” Big Government has actively spread and fostered a life of degradation via “free stuff.” It is so intrusive that it subverts families who might otherwise be healthy ones.

The wisdom of finding the “just right” formula may be difficult, but not at all impossible. The impossible aspect comes in via human nature. We are a petty, dishonest, and corrupt species. We are easily corrupted by “free stuff” and the politicians and other officials have absolutely no problem playing societal Robin Hood if it means furtherance into elective office or the bureaucracy.

A good person with wisdom doing the right thing is but a small island amongst the continent of congenital thieves and charlatans.

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