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Author Topic: FilmStruck
Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 09:41
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This happens. After all, there is nothing new under the sun. Captain Renault was originally included as a mockery of Vichy corruption. Then came Nixon, and he became a general symbol of corruption. Sex abuse has been a constant through the ages, so anything on that will always be appropriate.

A champagne bottle to the head can probably do quite a bit of damage. Much depends on where you hit.

When you first mentioned MUBI, you mentioned (among other things) the two French movies, so I had already briefly looked them up on wikipedia.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 10:33
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Yeah, Renault was definitely another Weinstein.

Regarding the champagne bottle to the head (big spoiler alert): It didn’t actually kill him. I left him bloodied a little but very much alive. In somewhat of a McGuffin of a plot point, a thief happened upon him at that very moment and (for some reason…this plot point made little sense at the time) finished him off with a gun (after the girl had fled the scene, of course).

This is a point that the viewer learns only at the end. The woman thinks she killed him with the champagne bottle. But she doesn’t know that this Weinstein was actually killed with a gun. But it all still works pretty well.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 11:05
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As it turns out, I have already seen Le Corbeau . . . probably on FilmStruck. I don’t remember much about it. I don’t remember if I finished it. I don’t think I did and I’ll just leave it at that.

Before canceling my 7-day trial of MUBI (I just don’t see the point of this service — it would be over-priced at $2.99 a month…it’s $8.99 a month), I’m going to check out 1963’s The Servant. After that, I see nothing on their current list of 30 movies that interests me.

Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 12:00
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This looks like another one of those aristocracy-hating movies. Think of the title character as a power-mad version of Jeeves and you get the idea. Bertie Wooster has much more control of his life than the "master" does in this one, at least at the end. (This is based on wikipedia, of course.)

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 12:49
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This looks like another one of those aristocracy-hating movies.

Having glanced at the list of the 30 available movies on MUBI, I’m sure you’re right. There’s a lot of Communist-oriented stuff. Basically (in my long-range view of things), most are just various expressions of the cultural wrecking ball that the Left loves to swing at everything standing.

Not that this might not be a good movie. And not that a good send-up of the aristocracy isn’t in order. But MUBI should honestly rebrand itself and change the name to LIBBI.

I gave The Servant about five 10 minutes earlier and it looks okay so far. At least enough to see where it goes. I’ll report back. Some of the Jeeves and Wooster episodes with Fry & Laurie are a howl. Surprisingly, I do not see Jeeves and Wooster available for streaming on any service. I’ve read a couple of the books (or perhaps parts of them) and enjoyed them. I’ll have to get back to that sometime.

---

Here’s the first book (free at Gutenberg): My Man Jeeves

You can find all of the Wodehouse offerings that Gutenberg has here, including at least one other Jeeves book.

Here are four (presumably) short stories packaged together for free at Amazon.

Here is apparently Wodehouse's first big success as well as his first truly refined bit of writing: Something New.

Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 12:55
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I can recall two Jeeves books. One involves Jeeves being loaned to a friend of Bertie Wooster, and the other has Jeeves urging Bertie throughout the book to take a vacation in a particular area as they visit a friend or family member or some such. (When Bertie tells a friend he has other plans, the friend is skeptical, rightly figuring that Jeeves will get his way in the end.)

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 13:11
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I remember that one — likely from the series. It's totally hilarious how Jeeves can steer Bertie to where he wants him to go.

Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 13:14
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Looking at wikipedia, the respective novels seem to be Ring for Jeeves and The Code of the Woosters. The latter was especially good.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 5, 2018, 21:46
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The Servant was a bust. It’s wonderfully filmed. But the acting is stale (except for the butler’s “sister”) and the premise for why the lord of the house should accept the behavior of the “bad butler” is never established. It just doesn’t work as a psychological thriller. We don’t care. I didn’t care. I left it on in the background through about 2/3 of it and it was basically like a Saturday Night Live sketch that ran on too long.

The butler, as played by Dirk Bogarde, is a stiff. He’s supposed to be menacing but he’s not. James Fox as the master is also a stiff. Only the “sister” of the butler offers any hope of substantial drama. Sarah Miles is a little hottie.

If you like watching paint dry in style, this movie may be for you. I cancelled the MUBI trial as well. Technically it will be available to me through December 11 but I already deleted the app off my phone. The search continues for a FilmStruck replacement.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: December 9, 2018, 10:24
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I watched a somewhat strange foreign film the other day on TUBI TV: The Saver.

If you like foreign films, this isn’t bad. It’s well acted and the story moves along. The problem is that the central character (a 16-year-old girl with some Indian blood) isn’t very appealing. But I do believe she is realistic.

Her mother has recently died (no father around, of course) and she decides to blow-off social services (it’s always some white woman who wants to help her) and instead go off on her own. Her prospects are dim but she finds a book on how to be a millionaire by saving (thus the title of the film) and that’s her plan.

She begins working two or three jobs, with a barely-there teenage attitude at times (lots of excuse-making) although she’s mostly competent. There is a semi-interesting cast of believable characters. This tends toward a “if people of color stick together outside of white people, we can get along” theme. But she goes to work for a black chef who eventually fires her for not showing up on time. So there.

And, of course, there’s the theme that “bitch, demanding, unpleasant people are just misunderstood.” One the girl’s jobs is a a sort of manager/janitor of a small apartment complex. One of the tenants is a white woman who is harsh and always complaining about something. And, of course, there is a can’t-we-all-just-get-along ending to this story which isn’t unbelievable but a grittier and more realistic ending might have been better — not all relationships can be repaired.

But whatever. This is a foreign (Canadian/French) film. “Foreign” means just that. You expect it to be a bit different. In fact, that’s why I enjoy watching them, Hollywood’s fare having long become stupid, vulgar, violent, and trivial.

Of course, what I’m thinking while I’m watch this is that she needs the guidance of a good man. But that’s been all but outlawed. And because she’s eschewed social services, there’s nothing left to guide her but instinct, a book she’s read, and her willingness to work. And she, of course, somewhat falls to pieces. But thank goodness for the entry of her Wise Indian Ex-con Uncle who now is benevolent and full of the soft, reasonable, and patient wisdom of the ages. Prison life can do that for you.

But Uncle Jack is an interesting character. He comes into the movie late, but his presence is much needed by the girl in order to start her moving in the right direction. And as one of her bosses tells her, and I paraphrase: “You need to learn to do one thing well instead of several things half-assed.” This was a white man who said this to a “person of color” so I’m quite sure some offense occurred.

And it’s not that I’m race-obsessed. Nor do I think this movie is race-obsessed. The fault is my own. But movies like this just seem always to be a parody waiting to happen. Fortunately, this one doesn’t do anything overtly goof. It just seem to be hovering in the background.

For a foreign film, it meets the threshold of watchability. But just barely.

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