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Author Topic: FilmStruck
Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 14, 2018, 10:11
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The reason they had to marry again was that Paula/Margaret had her husband declared dead after he was missing for 7 years -- even though I get the impression she was already his secretary and knew better by then.

That reminds me of something I forgot to mention. I thought the plot point of having her husband declared dead was another cul-de-sac for the plot to head down.

I thought the opening was charming. It seemed sophisticated with the stage set for all kinds of bittersweet moments. Instead it looks as if someone had writer’s block and could’t think of anything interesting to do. It’s a credit to Garson and Colman that they can give strength to and mostly carry this weak material.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 14, 2018, 10:23
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The Curies discovered polonium before discovering radium.

There. That would have been an interesting factoid to include in the movie. And they did mention that Marie’s father was a teacher of some kind, now that you mention it. But even that doesn’t automatically lead to encouraging a daughter into a profession populated by men.

If Marie spent time with her sister in Paris, we never see this or meet her.

The runtime at FilmStruck lists the movie as 124 minutes, so I’m assuming it wasn’t chopped up or dumbed-down.

In the film, Marie said she must return home to her father and to teach in Poland. Nothing was said about her being rejected as a teacher in Poland because she was a woman. And including the bit on the X-ray machines in WWI would have been a great addition to the movie.

Here's the online script for Forbidden Planet. It’s hard to tell who’s talking to whom. But in this clip we can see that it was Morbius who introduced the idea of the ID and then Nielsen who characterized it as “Monsters of the ID.”

I really do love Walter Pidgeon in this one. He’s just the wonderful stereotypical scientific idealist who is too naive to see the dire implications of his own notions.

Timothy-
Lane
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 14, 2018, 11:08
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Yes, they left out a lot that would have been worth including. Certainly her rejection for being a woman would have been included if it were made today. But maybe not the portable X-ray machines.

The conversation is in response to Doc having first mentioned the monsters from the id. So the captain asked Morbius what the id was, and Morbius finally answered, leading to the clip you linked to. Notice the captain mentioning that "That's what Doc meant." That's from the section a little earlier. It sure would have helped, though, if the script copy had included who was speaking.

Pidgeon was also Senate Majority Leader Bob Munson in Advise and Consent and the Admiral in Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 15, 2018, 08:52
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The fun thing about movie reviews (and watching movies) is that you can learn a lot about the subject after-the-fact. Perhaps a trip to WWI and the portable X-ray machines wouldn't have fit well with what they were doing. Still, a practical application of radium would have been interesting.

It's getting near time to another viewing of "Forbidden Planet."

Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 15, 2018, 09:51
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I think it was only a year or two ago that Elizabeth finally saw it on cable TV. She was very pleased, of course. Robby the Robot would be bad news for anyone trying to get rid of a drinking habit -- and probably a drug habit. I certainly wonder what his arrival did to the market for precious stones.

I doubt there are many practical uses for radium. X-rays have nothing to do with radioactivity, though it is useful for fluorescence. Radium used to be painted onto the numbers of fluorescent clocks, but this led to workers getting tongue cancer.

Brad-
Nelson
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 15, 2018, 11:19
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I’m glad Elizabeth finally saw Forbidden Planet. It’s one I picked up on sale at Best Buy a few years ago on Blu Ray.

Anne Francis is wonderful in it as the innocent, but hardly plastic (like Debbie Reynolds in “The Tender Trap”), nubile female. So we’re pretty much told, right?, that it was Dr. Morbius’ ID that was running the monster-generator (or generating the monster, however you want to look at it). And it was because deep-down he didn’t want to lose his daughter to Lieutenant Drebin? Or maybe he just didn’t want to cook his own meals.

I do remember news reports long ago about about the danger of radium painted on the faces of watches. This Wiki article notes that all dial painters stopped using their mouths to put a point on their brushes.

This other Wiki article notes that “Radioluminescent paint was invented in 1908 by Sabin Arnold von Sochocky[2] and originally incorporated radium-226. Radium paint was widely used for 40 years on the faces of watches, compasses, and aircraft instruments, so they could be read in the dark.” So one can assume that they stopped using radium in the late 1940’s.

The article notes that the radioactive isotope, radionuclide, emitted beta particles which were used to excite the radioluminescent phosphor that it was mixed with. These particles can’t escape the glass of the watch face. Radium, however, emitted gamma rays that could penetrate a glass watch dial and thus into human tissue. It’s interesting that they note that the radium would fairly quickly degrade the phosphor (which could, however, be painted on again in a thin layer). The radium itself used has a half-life of 1600 years, so bring that Geiger counter with you when garage sailing.

Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 15, 2018, 11:49
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Even the thinnest protections can block alpha and beta rays, but it takes a lot of mass to stop gamma rays (lead is used for its density, which affects the bulkiness of the protection but not its weight). It may have been lip cancers rather than tongue cancers (or maybe some of both).

This doesn't explain why the id-monster struck the original expedition. Most likely they were thinking of returning at a time when Dr. Morbius had good reason to want to stay. Of course, for a while they leave open the possibility that Altaira is in fact the creator. Note that after one of the monster's attacks, we see that both evidently had just woken from a troubled sleep. But Altaira evidently never tried the Krell IQ test, and couldn't have accessed the power generators.

Brad-
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Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 15, 2018, 18:06
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I’ll have to watch Forbidden Planet again and keep a closer watch on everyone’s ID.

We next move on to 1943’s Mr. Lucky. What a misconceived mess this is. I think they had an idea for the start and the finish and bent everything very hard to try to fit it. But this movie just doesn’t work at all.

It couldn’t decide whether it wanted to be a comedy or more of a crime thriller. In the end, it could do neither.

Timothy-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 15, 2018, 18:51
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Well, there is such a thing as a comedy thriller. Some of Hitchcock's work (e.g., The Lady Vanishes), but then he wasn't involved with this one. I will say that the ending, as described in wikipedia, sounds nice. Sort of reminds me of the ending of Fredric Brown's "Placet Is a Crazy Place", which appeals to the sentimentalist in me.

Brad-
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Post Re: FilmStruck
on: November 16, 2018, 15:25
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Next up is 1944’s Mrs. Parkington, a hodge-podge story of rags-to-riches, of spoiled rich families, of angry capitalists, and of a son who threatens the family with scandal.

There is no overall theme to this movies. It’s just things happening in succession. Agnes Moorehead is interesting as the old “friend” of Mr. Parkington who cleans up and directs the social life of his new wife (Greer Garson).

Somewhere in between all this is a horse accident, an attempted suicide, a mine explosion, a reluctant tenor, a grand social shunning, and serial payback. And none of it touched me beyond skin deep. Although the movie started well enough, it just kept going and going like the Energizer Bunny, seemingly just filling time. They try to bookend it with scenes of the elder Mrs. Parkington reminiscing. But it doesn’t solve the inherent problem that this movie is a bit of a bore.

One viewer said it well: “Tiresome cliched flashbacks through the lens of 40s MGM gloss.” This same reviewer writes:

Mrs. Parkington is a widow living in a big mansion and her adult children and grandchildren are visiting her on Christmas Eve, and we soon learn they are all leading disappointing unhappy lives. An author visits and leaves Mrs. Parkington a copy of a book he wrote about her "great American" family. This gives opportunity for the series of flashbacks.

Watching this poisonous family snipe at each other at the start was by far the best part of the movie. But then we flashback and, well, Garson is okay, I guess, but I don’t think Pidgeon works in the role.

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