Forums

Welcome Guest 

Show/Hide Header

Welcome Guest, posting in this forum requires registration.





Pages: First << 57 58 59 [60] 61
Author Topic: FilmStruck
Timothy-
Lane
Moderator
Posts: 1182
Permalink
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 17, 2018, 09:47
Quote

The wikiedia plot summary of The Seventh Veil (which never explains the title) seems to indicate that the movie gets really bizarre with a perhaps literally incredible ending. Of course, much depends on how it's played. So let's just say that she finally found someone and leave it at that. If you can slog through to find out who, so be it. If not, you can ask me or check wikipedia yourself.

Boy, I would never have thought Herbert Lom was a significant actor in 1945. All I recall him in are his movies with Peter Sellers, which seem to be mainly what you remember as well, and even the first of those didn't happen until the mid 60s.

Brad-
Nelson
Administrator
Posts: 1382
Permalink
Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 18, 2018, 08:56
Quote

I’m finding it a rough go trying to make it through “The Seventh Level of Hell.” Or “Veil.” Whatever. What a dreary mess. I may trudge on just to see if it has a point. Will you think the less of me when I say the high point of this picture so far was when James Mason slapped Ann Todd in the face? Ann Todd plays such an unsympathetic character. I just don’t care what happens to her.

Also, I watched the sequel to Harper: The Drowning Pool. Except for the scene where Newman & Friend fill up a room with water in order to attempt an escape, if this film was a heart monitor, it would be mostly flat.

You can tell that the writers are trying to mimic what a good Sam Spade or Philip Marlowe adventure should look like. They steal a bit here and there. But the whole does not look like a tight, integrated, interesting creative effort. It’s got a sort of focus-grouped “least common denominator’ vibe to it. I’d rather a film like this take a chance of being different and then flop rather than staying safe…and boring.

There’s nothing wrong with Newman as a detective. It’s just that the material isn’t very good. Harper was certainly a better movie. One reviewer writes:

Insanely-plotted murder mystery….Strictly TV-detective stuff, polished by the classy cast and Gordon Willis' terrific cinematography. It looks good and goes down smoothly, but doesn't leave a trace of itself behind.

Brad-
Nelson
Administrator
Posts: 1382
Permalink
Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 18, 2018, 21:19
Quote

So let's just say that she finally found someone and leave it at that.

I should have left it at that, Timothy. But I had to watch this. But not to see the ending. I was far more curious as to why anyone would make such a movie.

In the end, I guess they were just fascinated with Freudian psychology. This is a horrible movie, start to finish, dressed up by the presence of James Mason. And that’s all it has. I hope he collected a big paycheck for this.

Lom actually does a good job playing the German Freudian psychoanalyst. You can see that he’s a fine actor. But he’ll always be Chief Inspector Dreyfus to most of us.

Timothy, if you know the Vulcan technique for mind-meld forgetting (from Requiem for Methuselah), could you shoot me a little of that?

Just as a challenge, let me see if I can sum up this movie: Girl orphaned. Confirmed bachelor and distant cousin James Mason somewhat reluctantly accepts guardianship. They have nothing in common but love for music. He coaches her on the piano and eventually pays for her to go to music college. Girl traumatized by peanut butter sandwich landing peanut-side down. (Not really, but it would make as much sense…and actually, I don’t remember what sent her into a tizzy.)

Chief Inspector Dreyfus called in. Charges a lot for quack theories. Girl gets better. Chooses James Mason for her husband. The end.

If I left something out, I don’t care. There really is no point to this movie. “Forget.”

What was I saying?

Timothy-
Lane
Moderator
Posts: 1182
Permalink
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 18, 2018, 21:20
Quote

I hope that worked. Mind melds require personal contact.

Brad-
Nelson
Administrator
Posts: 1382
Permalink
Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 19, 2018, 08:43
Quote

Forget? Forget what? I've watched a couple Ingmar Bergman films in my time. The most pop-oriented I can think of is Through a Glass Darkly. But, honestly, you have to wonder what strange dark mental traumas one carries in oneself in order to explore the subject in a movie...at least in the way Bergman does it. And The Seventh Veil is similarly dark and depressing.

And I guess back in 1945, Freudianism was still rather new. The idea that the mind and personality were like a combination lock (find the right combination, and you could unlock and eliminate all woes) was in vogue. It probably still is. And I don't doubt there are many cases of trauma where repression of the trauma acted as a "one thing" to be unraveled that could solve all. That's what happened in this film which I barely remember....even though we don't actually see that healing moment.

I sometimes wonder how much damage Freudian psychology has done, trying to repair things in a way that isn't effective or realistic. But it's certainly made a lot of quacks a lot of money.

Timothy-
Lane
Moderator
Posts: 1182
Permalink
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 19, 2018, 09:43
Quote

Alfred Hitchcock did a couple of movies that paid a certain amount of attention to psychology, including the Freudian version. The first was Spellbound, which relies heavily on Freudian interpretation of dreams, including a crucial dream sequence appropriately illustrated by Salvador Dali. The later one was Marnie, about a kleptomaniac whose childhood holds the key to her mental regeneration. I enjoyed both, but then I would.

Brad-
Nelson
Administrator
Posts: 1382
Permalink
Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 19, 2018, 10:16
Quote

I think Marnie had a lot more going for it.

Best movies with a heavy psychological or mental health theme:

+ One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
+ The Three Faces of Eve
+ A Beautiful Mind
+ On Golden Pond
+ Rain Man
+ Sunset Boulevard
+ The Lost Weekend
+ The King's Speech
+ What About Bob?
+ K-Pax (unless he really was an alien)

Here's someone's list regarding that topic. Many of these I haven't seen. I don't remember enough about Regarding Henry or Sybil to add them to my own list.

Another list. Another another list.

Timothy-
Lane
Moderator
Posts: 1182
Permalink
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 19, 2018, 10:37
Quote

Well, I've seen Sunset Boulevard multiple times on TV. I also saw the musical when the cast toured Louisville -- with Petula Clark as Norma Desmond. (She described Desmond as "rich, spoiled, and totally out of touch with reality" and said she "adored playing her".) And, of course, I've seen Spellbound and Marnie as well as Psycho, which rather obviously also has a psychological theme (especially at the end) and Vertigo (with its scenes of Scotty Ferguson's dreams while catatonic). You could probably add Shadow of a Doubt as well.

The various lists include many movies I haven't even heard of, though also several I've seen. Silence of the Lambs is obviously a good choice, particularly since the villain is a psychiatrist himself and is consulted in the current serial killer case on that basis even in his jail cell. (But then, the Seattle police consulted Ted Bundy over the Green River Killer, Gary Ridgway.) I never saw Taxi Driver, but I did see (and can recommend) another Jodie Foster movie from that era, The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane.

Brad-
Nelson
Administrator
Posts: 1382
Permalink
Brad Nelson
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 19, 2018, 10:49
Quote

I don’t consider Silence of the Lambs to be about mental illness. To me it’s a good monster movie. Petula Clark as Norma Desmond? Sign me up. I would have loved to have seen that.

A few of those movies (such as Taxi Driver) I don’t remember any mentally ill component. But since all people are a little crazy — and that goes triple in movies — you could say that nearly any film has a psychological theme of some type. Certainly Lawrence in Lawrence of Arabia had a little mania going for him. I suppose all great or successful men have a little something.

Timothy-
Lane
Moderator
Posts: 1182
Permalink
Post Re: FilmStruck
on: September 19, 2018, 11:19
Quote

Well, they were trying to understand the motivations of Buffalo Bill in Silence of the Lambs, eventually concluding that he was trying to create a female skin to wear. Lawrence apparently discovered a taste for masochism after his adventure in Deraa.

Pages: First << 57 58 59 [60] 61
Mingle Forum by cartpauj
Version: 1.0.34 ; Page loaded in: 0.257 seconds.