Fantasy Ascendant

by Glenn Fairman  7/23/14

It is amazing to me that we must turn to the realm of fantasy to supply us with the heroics needed to combat monstrous evil. But if fantasy can supply the moral imagination with the courage that the world of flesh and blood lacks, then I am all for elves and wizards who believe that battling dragons, even though we perish in a ball of flame, is preferable to watching our existence being eaten away piece by piece.

Consigning our children to that Islamic living death because life, even the most wretched life, is held preferable to heroism, carries with it the promise of death many times over. Until we cauterize the grotesque and counterfeit vision of God and its corresponding understanding of man, we shall fight these battles on the plain of monotheism.
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Glenn Fairman writes from Highland, Ca. He can be reached at arete5000@dslextreme.com.


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3 Responses to Fantasy Ascendant

  1. Timothy Lane says:

    We don’t need fantasy to seek heroism. One can often find this in science fiction and historical fiction as well. There may even be some in contemporary fiction. Nor is it completely absent in real life, as awards of the Congressional Medal of Honor hint at. (Anyone familiar with the linkage of Vera Cruz with the CMH will know that such awards don’t always prove heroism, but they’re usually a reliable indicator.)

  2. Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

    It is amazing to me that we must turn to the realm of fantasy to supply us with the heroics needed to combat monstrous evil.

    I do not think this is anything new. Think of the Arthurian stories or the Song of Roland. There are numerous moral tales sprinkled throughout Western literature. Human beings, it seems, often need flights of imagination to help them rise to heights which would otherwise be out of their reach.

    • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

      Human beings, it seems, often need flights of imagination to help them rise to heights which would otherwise be out of their reach.

      That’s very well said, Mr. Kung. I’m not sure exactly what fantasy that Glenn is referring to. But certainly stories of heroism and good conduct can be great character builders. They provide a template. They are an example.

      I know how to act like John Wayne if I need to (minus the brawling abilities, or the gun fighting abilities, or the womanizing abilities, or the…you get the picture). He’s forthright, brave, straight-talking, bold, and does the right thing.

      And speaking of fantasy, much of fantasy fiction has been ruined because of the counter-culture element. Many of the super-hero characters were turned into brooding and somewhat feckless “heroes” who often were morally ambiguous characters rather than actual heroes. I’m all for exploring the complexities of life and human nature. But it was disturbing to me to see that much of this was not exploration as much as it was reveling in this stuff.

      I have to agree with Dennis Prager. Art used to be about producing beauty, generally speaking. Now it’s about producing various shades of ugliness. And it has helped to make our character ugly as well.

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