Into Thin Air

Suggested by Brad Nelson • A tale of the train-wreck of people, places, and circumstances that led to the death of eight climbers caught in a blizzard near the top of Mount Everest. This is written by a journalist, Jon Krakauer, who made the trip to the top and lived to write the story.
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A Vision of Light

Suggested by Brad Nelson • A 14th century Englishwoman enlists the help of a skeptical but hungry monk to help her put down her life’s story. We learn that during a stint as a midwife she is given a special gift. But the 14th century is a rough time, particularly for women, gift or no gift.
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Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

Suggested by Kung Fu Zu • Takes the reader from Stalin’s birth up to his fiftieth year. Kotkin interweaves Stalin’s story with that of Tsarist Russia of the same period. An excellent read.
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The Pointing Man: A Burmese Mystery

Suggested by Kung Fu Zu • The young assistant of a Burman curio shop owner goes missing. A banker, a vicar, and the wife of a high-ranking bureaucrat all seem to be hiding something. An old friend who works for the Indian Government, Coryndon, happens along and sets about to solve the mystery.
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The Struggle for Mastery in Europe

Suggested by Kung Fu Zu • This book deals with the diplomatic history of Europe from 1848 — when Europe and European powers held primacy in world affairs — through 1918, by which time Europe had receded into secondary or tertiary importance in world politics.
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The Most Dangerous Enemy

Suggested by Brad Nelson • Stephen Bungay’s account of the Battle of Britain is an engrossing read for the military scholar and the general reader alike. This is a classic of military history that looks beyond the mythology to explore the crucial battle to save Western Civilization from a 1000 years of darkness.
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The Dam Busters

Suggested by Brad Nelson • A story of real men who understood evil, of brilliant minds who saved a world from a thousand years of darkness. Should be required reading of all graduating high school seniors. We should never forget the story of 617.
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Killing the Rising Sun

Suggested by Brad Nelson • An enthralling, gripping account of the bloody battles, huge decisions, and historic personalities that culminated in the decision to drop the atomic bomb and brought the war in the Pacific to its climactic end.
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Sharpe’s Tiger

Suggested by Kung Fu Zu • Sharpe, born to a whore, is a violent, crude, illiterate young man. He is also brave, clever, strong, and lucky. Sharpe, along with young Arthur Wellesley, are in India to fight the Tippoo of Mysore, a powerful Muslim ruler in South India.
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Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders

Suggested by Kung Fu Zu • For fans of the TV series, this is a must read. It is something of a personal memoir and a narration of Rumpole’s most famous case; one that he mentions in almost every episode. I can see Leo McKern potificating about it over a glass of Plonk at Pommeroy’s.
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Killing Floor

Suggested by Kung Fu Zu(Jack Reacher, Book 1) • Ex-military policeman Jack Reacher is a drifter. He’s just passing through Margrave, Georgia, and in less than an hour he’s arrested for murder. All Reacher knows is that he didn’t kill anybody. At least not here.
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Where Are the Children?

Suggested by Timothy Lane • Nancy was found guilty of murdering her two children, but was released from prison on a technicality. Seven years later, having moved to Cape Cod, Nancy is remarried and has two small children but her past catches up to her.
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