The Ballad of Pandora

by Deana Chadwell    1/18/14

Whose childish wonder undid us,
Whose thoughts went no wider than Eve’s
Stopped not at the word forbidden
But chose, both proud and naïve,

To open the jar Zeus gave her.
Without hesitation worthwhile,
She opened the gift, befuddled,
Discovering everything vile —

Everything nasty and selfish
Everything twisted with guile –
All quarrelsome, sordid, vicious things
Peered out with lascivious smiles.

By hooking their long, lacquered claws
On the golden, forbidden rim,
Every sneaky, despicable, horrible thing
Slithered out, gray-finned and grim.

Over the top, surging onto the ground
The ghastly slimed into this world.
The smelly, evil, churlish and rude
Round her feet, up The Tree, they swirled.

From Tree they hissed, “This fruit, now eat.”
Then that time she chose to obey;
The juice of fruit that swelled her veins
Affects us all to this day.

Affects us all, the bad, the good,
Yet Hope appeared; she believed;
Hope wears a searing crown of thorns
Hope saved both Pandora and Eve.
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Deana Chadwell

About Deana Chadwell

I have spent my life teaching young people how to read and write and appreciate the wonder of words. I have worked with high school students and currently teach writing at Pacific Bible College in southern Oregon. I have spent more than forty years studying the Bible, theology, and apologetics and that finds its way into my writing whether I’m blogging about my experiences or my opinions. I have two and a half moldering novels, stacks of essays, hundreds of poems, some which have won state and national prizes. All that writing — and more keeps popping up — needs a home with a big plate glass window; it needs air; it needs a conversation.
I am also an artist who works with cloth, yarn, beads, gourds, polymer clay, paint, and photography. And I make soap.

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One Response to The Ballad of Pandora

  1. Timothy Lane says:

    An interesting link between the creation stories of the two cultures most responsible (ultimately) for Western civilization.

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