At The Breaking of Republics

by Glenn Fairman7/21/15

At the breaking of republics —
when the people can no longer bear sound counsel, and the exhortations of wisdom fall to the earth — barren and sterile as servitude.


Glenn Fairman writes from Highland, Ca.
About Author  Author Archive  Email

Have a blog post you want to share? Click here. • (1373 views)

Share
Glenn Fairman

About Glenn Fairman

retired
This entry was posted in Blog Post. Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to At The Breaking of Republics

  1. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    Geez, Glenn. I’ve told you before. Please break down your verbose thoughts into short, digestible bites!

    But this is “fundamental change,” baby. It’s the Brave New World. It’s the construction of The New Man dreamed about as long ago as The French Revolution. Who knew it would consist of selling unborn baby body parts for money? Or bullying people into not just “tolerating” sexual perversion but forcing them to “celebrate” it?

    And on and and on (including giving nukes to probably the nuttiest people on the planet).

    I’ve had deep second thoughts about the utility of this site. I know…I don’t “think,” I know…that there is nothing we can do or say to bring back that republic. We can spit into the wind. We can snarl. We can vent. But we can’t change what is happening. And I’m getting tired of snarling. The best revenge is always to live well.

    And in the scheme of things, selling unborn baby body parts for money is just a cheap sideline for the horrors that could come after.

    Perhaps the only reason I keep this site going (and it’s not for venting, which I see as almost pointless) is to breath in a little high culture and sanity from time to time. Sinatra. George Washington. Hell, even Lt. Columbo. I consider most Americans now to be my ideological enemy. Oh, I don’t mean they’ll necessarily actively do me harm. But they are pod people. They will passively allow anything to occur, as they are doing now. They are the people Edward Woodward ran into in “The Wicker Man.” They’re all so “nice.” What harm could come from that?

    But they’re not nice. As I was trying to explain (completely unsuccessfully) to a couple conservative-friendly people yesterday, the entire point about homosexuality is, one, it’s a further girlification of men and the furtherance of feminism (by diminishing the male): two, it’s the reduction of men in pursuit of “equality”; and three, and perhaps most important, it has nothing at all to do with the well-being of those who engage in homosexual acts. It’s about people, by lauding perversion, showing how supposedly nice, tolerant, and sophisticated they are. It’s all about them. It’s narcism, if not the modern equivalent of buying an Indulgence for their own shoddy behavior.

    But given the reality of homosexuality (an inherently dead-end and unhealthy lifestyle choice), no truly compassionate person would want that for any boy or man. They might “hate the sin, love the sinner” but there would still be that sin part. In a sane world, it would be considered cruel to make it easy for males to go down this dead-end road of pain and misery.

    But, instead, they are just so damn “nice.” And they’re also so damn “nice” regarding the issue of abortion. And they’re just do damn “nice” regarding the issue of Iran getting nukes. Or the issues of illegal aliens. Or the issue of the national debt. Or the issue of black racism. Or the issue of our diminished school system. Or…you name it. Everyone is just so damn “nice.”

    This New Man is oh so nice…morally as stupid as a brick, intellectually barren, and infused with vulgarity…but he’s oh so damn “nice.” Sing it, Frank.

    • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

      Brad,

      I wish you would stop beating around the bushes and tell us what you really think.

      KFZ

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        Someone was telling me the other day, the older he got, the less filtered his thoughts were. I guess I can appreciate that.

        It’s a delicate balance. The truth today, as Orwell said, is truly revolutionary. And yet we shouldn’t be potty-mouths without a purpose, nihilists, or internet verbal anarchists. I try to skirt that line creatively.

    • Timothy Lane says:

      An important point about homosexuality, especially homosexual marriage, is that it further the liberal goal of androgynizing society. Liberal dogma proclaims man and woman as identical cogs in the machine of society, and anything that helps make that seem to be true is desirable. Since it isn’t true, the results will be very harmful in the long run.

    • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

      And in the scheme of things, selling unborn baby body parts for money is just a cheap sideline for the horrors that could come after.

      As Planned Parenthood seems so intent on squeezing every cent out of the sale of body parts, one wonders if they are selling baby skin for lamp shades. There is, after all, a tradition of this type of thing with PP’s antecedents.

      • Timothy Lane says:

        I believe that was associated with Ilse Koch (the Bitch of Buchenwald), but was never actually proven. Removing the teeth to get gold and silver fillings was one of their more ghoulish tricks, but not one likely to be useful for PP.

    • I believe, Brad, that it was Stonewall Jackson who said, “Duty is mine; the consequences belong to God.” That’s how I feel about writing right now. There’s a large segment of this society that will never buy the truth — it doesn’t even matter why. But I write to connect with the other segment that does hunger for reality. And I, for one, am very grateful that this site exists, for writing without an audience and without discussion is pointless. We’ll all just keep singing the song and refining our acts, and who knows? Maybe the orcs will lock us all up, or maybe the truth will out, and there’s really not any maybe about it.

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        There’s a large segment of this society that will never buy the truth — it doesn’t even matter why. But I write to connect with the other segment that does hunger for reality.

        It would be interesting to know who is hungering and if they recognize which part of their current diet is short on calories. Can man find sustenance in a bit of Churchillian “blood, toil, tears, and sweat” when people right now think the point of life is comfort and non-stop entertainment? And if they do happen to think in terms of the Big Picture and morals, what can one say to those who see the “big picture” as global warming and who think because they are “inclusive” and “non-judgmental” that they are already the finest bunch of people ever to grace the planet?

        Reality has a significant “b, t, t, and s” component. It’s not all about sitting around being self-congratulatory or getting high on the airplane glue of the kind of moral exhibitionism that is typical of the Left and Progressives.

        We don’t offer Utopia. We require work, honesty, integrity, and self-responsibility. You don’t get to be the victim. We don’t abide absolute nonsense such as 57 flavors of gender.

        Do some thirst? Do some hunger? Are there many minds not so crippled that they can even just guess that what they view as real is not the real? I wonder sometimes.

        And thanks for your many contributions to this site. It wouldn’t be the same without you. I’d take another dozen of you, but I’m pretty sure that mold was broken. 😀

  2. Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

    I see Glenn is becoming more Nietzschean in his lessons.

    • Glenn Fairman says:

      When it all comes down to dust, we are faced with either Manifest Order or Nihilism. Although their natures and ends are mutually exclusive, they hold one thing in common– the Will. The only difference is, whose will is to ultimately prevail: the man of mud’s or his Master’s?

  3. Anniel says:

    Glenn, Brevity is wonderful, and can be so profound in its implications. Than you for a beautiful thought piece.

    • Timothy Lane says:

      An interesting list, not as heavy on the Silicon Valley types as I’d expect, though Ben & Jerry’s is no surprise. Macy’s explains their reaction to Trump. I guess media companies decided it was inadvisable to declare their loyalty to them. I don’t think we patronize any of them (except for drinking Pepsi when that’s what is available).

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        I’ve had a Bank of America account for some time. They acquired my bank some time bank and this will be as good as an excuse as any to dump them.

        Pepsi is crap. Yeah, there are those rare times where I’d rather drink (Diet Pepsi) than nothing at all. But it’s one of the signs of the coming apocalypse that yutes actually prefer this crap drink.

    • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

      I have emailed the link to a couple of conservative organizations in Collin County.

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        Some will no doubt “officially” dump their sponsorship in the short-term. But they’ll be back. As long as you can all this monstrous act a part of “women’s health,” you’re good to go in today’s monstrously “Progressive” immoral environment…and an air-headed one it is.

  4. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    When it all comes down to dust, we are faced with either Manifest Order or Nihilism. Although their natures and ends are mutually exclusive, they hold one thing in common– the Will. The only difference is, whose will is to ultimately prevail: the man of mud’s or his Master’s?

    Someone sent me a link to this:

    Historically, pastors were powerful leaders in their communities—today they are marginalized and ignored. The influence of the pulpit has been replaced by the media, celebrities, and special interest groups to such an extent that the world considers the Church irrelevant as an agent for cultural change.

    Preaching was once considered the hallmark of the Church. It was pointed, prophetic, and personal. Today, it is too often oriented toward success, self-improvement,
and self-fulfillment. Biblical principles are more often tailored to meeting personal needs rather than transforming culture by being salt and light.

    
The result has been an ever-widening gap between private faith and public behavior. Kairos Journal prays and works toward the day when the Church is once again the moral conscience and prophetic voice to the nation. In that day, the biblical pastor will reclaim his unique role as the God-appointed gatekeeper to the spiritual and moral standards of the nation.

    The aim is not rule by clerics but the reign of Christ and His Word in the hearts and minds of the citizenry. This is the prayed-for, preached-for Awakening. It champions religious liberty and uses that liberty to saturate the nation’s consciousness with godly perspectives and Christian virtues. Kairos Journal is founded in a moment of crisis—for such a time as this—to hasten an age of cultural revival in Christ—for such a time as that.

    Whether this is just another avenue to disguise “social justice,” I do not know. But it doesn’t sound like it. One very big gap left out of this bit:

    Today, it is too often oriented toward success, self-improvement, and self-fulfillment.

    It should read:

    Today, it is too often oriented toward success, self-improvement, self-fulfillment, and treating “the poor” as a mascot that you adopt like a puppy, with the purpose of adoption not redemption of character but of showing the world how damn “compassionate” you supposedly are, with the material and spiritual health of “the poor” being secondary, if important at all.

    Much of “religion” has become little but a “poverty industry,” creating this gigantic infrastructure that has not only made it easy for the downtrodden to stay comfortable in their sin but actually attracts others to this way of life.

  5. Glenn Fairman says:

    Indeed, Brad. Perhaps the compassion that proceeds from the prickly “no” is ultimately the most loving act.

    I have been reading many of the articles and comments on this site and I hope you are proud at what you have accomplished Brad.

    • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

      Perhaps the compassion that proceeds from the prickly “no” is ultimately the most loving act.

      Indeed, this is often the case. A parent knows that one must not allow one’s child to pursue every hare-brained idea which comes into the child’s head. At times, the child will resent such guidance to an extreme degree and even tell the parent, “I hate you!” There are very few things which are more hurtful to a parent. But the parent’s love will remain true to the best interests of the child, despite the slings and arrows cast the parent’s way.

    • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

      Thanks, Glenn!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *