Ann Coulter’s Article Hits Home – Literally

Ebolaby Susan D. Harris   8/10/14
Ann Coulter’s recent article “Ebola Doc’s Condition Downgraded to Idiotic” really hit home – if you’ll excuse the pun. Coulter makes a good argument as she questions why American missionaries don’t stay home and help a country in the violent throes of spiritual decay.  She accuses them of slinking off to Third World countries (and coming back with Ebola), while they abandon the most consequential nation on earth — their own.

It’s a thought I’ve often had as I’ve watched church after church suck their congregations dry for overseas missionary work while the old lady in the house next-door struggles for food – physically and financially.  These same missionaries are lauded as heroes for going to Africa when their hometowns are awash in drugs, pornography, murders, domestic abuse, pedophilia, and a thousand other byproducts of spiritual darkness.

I would go even farther and liken the situation to child adoption in the U.S. Couples, often citing impossible U.S. adoption laws and red tape, have been going overseas to adopt children for years while nearly 400,000 American children remain in foster care.  Roughly 102,000 of those are waiting to be adopted at any given time, and another 58,000 become available for adoption after their parents’ rights are terminated.[pullquote]It’s a thought I’ve often had as I’ve watched church after church suck their congregations dry for overseas missionary work while the old lady in the house next-door struggles for food – physically and financially.[/pullquote]

I know a Christian couple who recently adopted five siblings from Bhutan.  Another couple, misled about the health of a newborn, adopted a Russian baby who needed so many operations they nearly went bankrupt and ended up divorcing.  All of this happens while a little boy or girl from Nebraska or Kentucky grows up in the uncertain love and insecurity of foster care.  I’ve rarely met a couple who adopted an American-born child.

The truth is, instead of staying and fighting, Americans developed a pattern of running to other countries – whether for missionary work, adoption, or cheaper labor and smaller overhead.

I once worked for a company that boasted they used only local contractors in order to “keep their money in the community.”  Imagine my surprise when I found out their largest “local” contractor actually contracted his work to Mexico.

Despite our professed American pride, we became increasingly lured to foreign countries to avoid crippling taxes in our homeland; we became enchanted with converting foreigners instead of helping our own neighbors.

Years ago I was looking for a church in my new area; longing for fellowship with other Christians.  I invited a friend to attend a Sunday service at a church I was considering attending. My friend was an Indian national who floundered between Buddhism and Hinduism.  I suppose I hoped he’d convert to Christianity one day, but as I got to know him I doubted that would ever happen.  After the service, we were descended upon — I was happy and eager to make new friends with similar beliefs.  To my surprise, they surrounded my Indian friend and quite conspicuously ignored me.  I received neither greeting nor handshake. My friend was amused and indulged them.  We wrote our addresses in the visitor’s log.  The next day I visited my friend and found his table filled with baked goods; courtesy of a contingent of ladies from the church who knocked on his door at 9 a.m.  As he bit into a piece of chocolate cake, he laughed at them. He confessed he always enjoyed getting food or gifts from Christian’s eager to boast they’d converted some Third World pagan.  I sighed at my loneliness for Christian fellowship and chomped down a brownie.

Ann Coulters article was harsh, but it needed to be said.  I only regret that it was Franklin Graham’s Samaritan’s Purse that found itself in the eye of the Ebola hurricane. Samaritan’s Purse has consistently been one of the first responders when disaster strikes here at home.  They raised $37 million dollars as they toiled at disaster relief units in Louisiana and Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina.  They were there for the victims of Hurricane Sandy, bringing in truckloads of emergency supplies including chainsaws, tarps and generators.  They rushed to assist flood victims inPensacola, Florida deal with water damage, removal of wet insulation and spraying for mold. In short, this organization knows how to help at home too.

I have no affiliation with Samaritan’s purse, I just like give credit where credit is due.

Recently, Franklin Graham courageously reprimanded his Christian colleagues — right here in America — for not speaking out against the moral issues of our day.  “God hates cowards,” he told a gathering of pastors at a Watchman on the Wall event in Washington, D.C. last May.

The speech was reminiscent of his father’s, (Rev. Billy Graham’s), early years.  (Back before he became more “mellow;” stopped preaching the Biblical truths of Hell and Judgment; confessed the Clinton’s were “wonderful friends,” and suggested Bill become an evangelist and let Hillary run the country.)

There was none of that in Franklin Graham’s address:

God hates cowards.  And the cowards that the Lord is referring to are the men and women who know the truth but refuse to speak it…We have a responsibility to speak on the moral issues.  Abortion, homosexuality, these are moral issues.  This is a free country, you can do what you want to do but I want you to know it’s a sin against God.  This is a sin…

Directing his remarks at pastors who refuse to address these issues for fear of “becoming targets,” Graham said, “Well don’t you think the Lord Jesus Christ was a target? … Could we get our heads chopped off?  We could, maybe one day.  So what?  Chop it off!”

It’s lamentable that it was Graham’s organization that created such controversy by bringing their volunteers back to America to be treated for Ebola; because it could have been any number of secular organizations knocking at the door of Emory University Hospital for access to their specialized isolation unit.

Still, Ann Coulter was right to raise such relevant questions: “…Why do we have to deal with this at all?  Can’t anyone serve Christ in America anymore?”

Coulter said:  “Your country is like your family.  We need to take care of our own.”  Indeed we are a nation in peril.  It’s time to sound the shofar and ring the church bells – not just as a warning, but to summon decent, God-fearing Americans everywhere: “Come home…your family needs you!”

(This article originally appeared in American Thinker.)


Susan D. Harris can be reached at SusanDHarris.com. • (1558 views)

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11 Responses to Ann Coulter’s Article Hits Home – Literally

  1. Glenn Fairman says:

    Susan and I have shared correspondence for a while and she is a very fine author, Having her voice on this site would be highly beneficial.

    • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

      Indeed. I hope everyone will check out her site. It’s a great resource, full of great content. And just from an aesthetic view, it’s a cut above about 90% of conservative sites that I’ve seen.

  2. Timothy Lane says:

    I see nothing wrong with missionaries going to foreign countries, though we certainly shouldn’t neglect our own needs (both physical and spiritual). One specific complaint Coulter made was against a form of spiritual narcissism — ostentatious do-gooding that often does little or no real good. This undoubtedly happens, both here and abroad. (Hollywood celebrities are notorious for very ostentatiously showing their solidarity with the poor while doing nothing to really help them.)

    My biggest concern over the ebola situation is bringing the doctors back rather than treating them in Africa. They deserve the best treatment we can provide, but there is a great deal of expense — and a certain amount of risk to the public, slighted by those who profess that there’s “little danger” but who aren’t the ones who would suffer if we have an ebola outbreak here that kills a few hundred people.

  3. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    The money quote in this article is this:

    Years ago I was looking for a church in my new area; longing for fellowship with other Christians. I invited a friend to attend a Sunday service at a church I was considering attending. My friend was an Indian national who floundered between Buddhism and Hinduism. I suppose I hoped he’d convert to Christianity one day, but as I got to know him I doubted that would ever happen. After the service, we were descended upon — I was happy and eager to make new friends with similar beliefs. To my surprise, they surrounded my Indian friend and quite conspicuously ignored me. I received neither greeting nor handshake. My friend was amused and indulged them. We wrote our addresses in the visitor’s log. The next day I visited my friend and found his table filled with baked goods; courtesy of a contingent of ladies from the church who knocked on his door at 9 a.m. As he bit into a piece of chocolate cake, he laughed at them. He confessed he always enjoyed getting food or gifts from Christian’s eager to boast they’d converted some Third World pagan. I sighed at my loneliness for Christian fellowship and chomped down a brownie.

    On the surface if it, one could wonder what’s wrong with a little love-bombing of an Indian (dots, not feathers)?

    Well, what’s wrong is that this shows the ugly underbelly of Cultural Marxism which spreads guilt about the white man (who is considered inherently an oppressor) and treats “people of color” as inherent victims.

    And white people (in or out of a Christian church) have been indoctrinated with this ideology. It amounts to hating your own culture and reducing the entire concept of good and evil to skin color. And the means to escape this instilled guilt at being white and Western is to embrace “people of color.” And you embrace them regardless of whether or not they are virtuous (such as those stealing across our southern border).

    In this “compassion” are the seeds for the destruction of our own culture. Many Christians are useful idiots for the Left. They need to be “Wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.” Well, one could say they got the “harmless” part down pat, but not much else. And even their “harmlessness” (what amounts to a moral relativist non-judgmentalism) is not so harmless indeed.

  4. Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

    I can’t remember who recommended this article, or if I found it by following a link embedded in a suggested article, but I just heard back and was denied permission to re-publish Albert Mohler’s Moralistic Therapeutic Deism—the New American Religion. But it is indeed worth a read. I would have assumed that getting this message out to the widest possible audience was the point. I guess not. But I do think it is worth reading.

    • Timothy Lane says:

      Mohler, the president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary here in Louisville, is a staunch fundamentalist. This has led the Carver School of Social Work to leave for a different seminary (a sensitive issue for Elizabeth, since it’s named after her maternal grandfather). A local joke among some Southern Baptists is: Q: What’s the difference between Al Mohler and God? A: God doesn’t think he’s Al Mohler. This may affect where he wants his writing to appear (though I have seen him write letters to the Curious Journal).

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        Then I guess weeze just wasn’t good enough for them. 😀 We’re not the Great Unwashed here. Just the Slightly Unwashed.

        But, seriously, hopefully there is some ground between the extremes of “Christianity as narcissism” and “Christianity as clenching your butt cheeks too tightly.” We can always try.

  5. Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

    So now we have Ebola in the USA. Obola has managed to combine a horrible immigration policy with an incompetent health policy to create the worst of both worlds. I would not be surprised if Obola is not terribly upset that Ebola has crossed the seas to settle in America. Now the US will invest billions in the search for a cure. Something like the AIDS con.

    From a Breitbart piece today.

    “If they had stepped in earlier with a more robust prevention plan, presumably this case from Dallas would not have happened,” she said, adding that Duncan–the man with Ebola in Dallas–should have been stopped from entering the United States.
    “First of all, he is what we call a third-country national — someone applying for a non-immigrant visa outside their country of citizenship,” Vaughan said. “That is a red flag, because it means that the applicant’s ties to the country in which he is living are assumed to be weak. Add to that the fact that he is apparently a young single unemployed male Liberian living in Ghana and a citizen of the country that has one of the highest visa overstay rates of any country in the world and he already has a close family member in the US, and this was his first trip to the US.”
    “There are many factors weighing against issuing this visa under any circumstances, regardless of the Ebola problem,” she explained. “Personally, I am comfortable saying that I probably would not have issued this man a visitor’s visa at all. This guy was a visa overstay waiting to happen.”

    • Timothy Lane says:

      There was speculation on NRO that the victim might be an illegal immigrant. Rush noted today that the authorities refused to answer questions about his citizenship status, which in itself is a reliable answer. Of course, the same people who assured us that we wouldn’t be getting any Ebola victims here at all now assure us that there’s no danger of a serious outbreak here. Let’s hope they’re right — for once. But I would never trust any of them (including the CDC, which infamously proclaimed violence “a disease spread by bullets” during the Clinton era; I’ve distrusted them ever since).

  6. Timothy Lane says:

    Whatever one says about the doctors Ann Coulter was talking about in that article, I think a good case can be made that the doctor who recently was diagnosed with Ebola in NYC fits her description perfectly. However courageous or honorable his service with Doctors Without Borders in the Ebola zone, his behavior after he got back was utterly self-indulgent and put many people at risk — including a large number of people (once they’re all located) who will face lengthy quarantines because of him. So was his behavior altruistic, or just a peculiar form of ostentatious narcissism?

    • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

      Great minds think alike. It seems to me that there has been nothing but a further confirmation of Ann’s critiques since she first published that article.

      There is more than a little self-indulgance, indeed.

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