An Exchange with Dr. Evans

by Patricia L. Dickson6/1/15

Patricia has been having an email exchange with the Atlanta school principal in regards to the cheating scandal that Patricia wrote about in Black Atlanta Educators Cheated Kids Out of an Education. She requested that this exchange be shared here. — Editor


Hello Dr. Evans,

I must say that I was surprised and honored to receive an email from you. Before I received your email, I did not know who you were. I did not mention you in my article that you referenced. In fact, I had to google you so that I could get more facts about your case before I responded to your email. I guess I should feel honored because I have been given the opportunity to address you directly. I must confess to you that your email has caused me to have to revisit this entire ordeal (something that I wanted to forget). The more I read about the case, the more angry and sad I become. It appears from the tone of your email, that you feel the need to explain your innocence and somehow correct the inaccuracies surrounding the case (clear your name.):

“But, these are not things the media seems interested in – truth, instead there seems to be a deliberate attempt to paint me as a despicable criminal that intentionally hurt the very children I worked to save.”

What I cannot understand is why you feel that you specifically are being singled out in the cheating scandal. From what I have read about the case, you were not singled out as the ringleader or the one that initiated the behavior. You were simply held accountable for the actions of your subordinates (something, although unfortunate, that is part of leadership). I know very well what is expected of a leader because I spend 21 years in the military. I have not read anywhere so far where you are mentioned specifically as an individual that directed anyone to harm children. What I believe was in the mind of the jurors was that you as a leader knew or should have known what was going on in your school. Because of that belief, I believe the jurors found you guilty (held you accountable).

Now, I would like to address some of the statements you made in your email. You stated the following:

“The three (yes three) teachers that cheated at my school admitted under oath that they cheated without my knowledge and they hid it from me. How do you conspire with someone who hides it from you? They also admitted that they cheated before I got to the school (I did mention I was a new Principal and also new to the school).”

From court testimonies, I believe the three teachers that you mentioned are Derrick Broadwater, Naomi Williams (claimed that you fired her after she told you about being asked by teacher Dessa Curb to change answers), and Shayla Smith (late to work over 100 times). My question to you is although you may not have been aware that these three teachers were engaged in cheating, did you not know that a state investigation found a third of classrooms at your school in 2009 had high rates of wrong-to-right changes on state test answer sheets? According to the testimony of Brian Jacob, students in one fourth-grade class at your school had a one in 288 septillion chance of doing as well as they purportedly did on the 2009 Criterion-Referenced Competency Test. “That’s 27 zeros”. Were you not aware or suspicious of any of this? These are questions that a rational individual sitting on a jury would want answered.

You also stated:

I worked to equalize the academic opportunities for my kids at Dobbs – based on my fundamental belief that they deserved the same quality of education the students from the advantaged school received.

Why do you see the other school (your former school) as advantaged? How did you expect to equalize the academic opportunities of poor black children when the teachers at Dobbs were not competent enough to teach the kids to begin with (you stated that they testified to cheating before you ever got there)? It appears, Dr. Evans, that you did all you could to provide tools (computers and equipment) to improve the children’s learning environment, however without competent teachers, it is impossible for our black children to rise to the level (to become equal) of white children when it comes to education. Money will not compensate for incompetency (although you are quite competent). The very reason it was difficult for you to fire incompetent underperforming teachers is all the public school funding going to the teacher’s union who protect the jobs of these incompetent teachers.

I would like to give you a little of my personal history with education and educators. I graduated from high school in 1984 (over thirty years ago). I started kindergarten in 1970 (unbeknownst to me at the time, the school systems in the south had just integrated). I grew up in a poor working class neighborhood (as well as all my friends and cousins). My parents were not educated (my father made it to the 5th grade, my mother made it to the 9th). My schoolteacher’s salaries were so low that they qualified for food stamps. However, my friends, my cousins, and I received the best education that money could not buy. My teachers were competent and they cared about us (in fact, they would use a leather paddle on our behinds if we came to school without our homework assignments). A section of my elementary school (it was about one hundred years old anyway) caught fire one weekend. We continued to attend that same school (we never skipped a beat) while they built us a new school. We continued attending classes in a section of the school that was not affected by the fire. My high school was also about one hundred years old. During my sophomore year, they began tearing down half of the school and rebuilding a new one. Again, we continued to attend classes in half of the school. Our school cafeteria was torn down. The school system contracted with McDonalds (to our delight) to bring us lunch every day. All of my black friends and cousins graduated from high school and college and are doing well right to this day (praise God). I am telling you all of this because I do not understand why black politicians, leaders, school administrators, and educators keep citing funding as an excuse to why our black children are underperforming. Or, that the state testing is somehow unjust. When I was in the tenth grade, we had to take a state competency test. All but two girls passed it and were able to graduate with our diplomas (if we did not pass the state test, we would not have been able to graduate even if we passed all of our classes). So, Dr. Evans, can you please explain to me why would teachers (not only in your school district) have to cheat in order for their kids to pass the state test? What is preventing our children from learning the information? I believe we all know what the real problem is. It is the lack of a stable family. As I mentioned about my own experiences, although my parents were uneducated, I had two of them. My father worked at the town’s cotton gin and provided for us. They could not help me with my homework assignments (although my father did teach me my ABCs and arithmetic), however; they would whip my behind if one of my teachers told them that I did not complete my homework. Our children are the product of single mothers who themselves are not properly educated. That is not the fault of white America. We in the black community are doing our children a disservice by not addressing the problem of single parenthood and instead blaming white people and society for our problems.

Finally, I would like to address your statement about the commenters under my article:

“After further reading your blog I see that many of your readers don’t really have much respect for Blacks. That is unfortunate because I believe you say you are a Christian, as am I. I will pray for you tonight in hopes that God can help you to understand what Jesus said in Matthew, all of the commandments are hinged on two: 1) Love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and 2) ‘Love your neighbor as yourself”

As you should know, I am not responsible for the people who comment on my articles. Anyone from anywhere in the world can comment on any article. I am a contributing writer for different blogs. To question my Christian faith based on strangers commenting on my article is a stretch for someone as educated as yourself. However, because I am a Christian, I will always write and speak the truth (regardless of who I offend). You had to stand before a worldly judge during your sentencing (one that was quite fond of you because you were once his child’s counselor). I, as well as everyone, will have to stand before God and give an account for every word that I speak or write. That is why I do not shy away from the truth. I do not participate in political correctness or race solidarity. I only align with people and causes that support truth. In addition, Dr. Evans, I want to leave you with the assurance that God is a God of forgiveness and mercy. He will never turn His back on those that love Him. I will continue to pray for you and your family.

I John 1:9

If we [freely] admit that we have sinned and confess our sins, He is faithful and just (true to His own nature and promises) and will forgive our sins [dismiss our lawlessness] and [continuously] cleanse us from all unrighteousness [everything not in conformity to His will in purpose, thought, and action].

Kind regards,

Patricia L. Dickson


PatriciaDicksonPatricia Dickson blogs at Patricia’s Corner.
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20 Responses to An Exchange with Dr. Evans

  1. Timothy Lane says:

    Well, I see you’re about 15 years younger than I am. And the importance of having parents (2 being better than 1 that way) who set standards has been noted by some others. Apparently this is why Eastern Asians do so well: their parents expect them to do very well. Being able to help with homework can be useful, but setting up the standards is probably far more important. A good example is Ben Carson’s mother expecting him and his siblings to write book reports on the library books they read — even though she couldn’t read them herself.

  2. Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

    After further reading your blog I see that many of your readers don’t really have much respect for Blacks

    This is simply a sophisticated way of saying, “your readers are racists.” By saying this, the principal attempts to cut off all discussion. This is a familiar trope which, from being so misused, has lost all power for any thinking person. Aesop could substitute it for his story about the boy who cried wolf too often.

    I went back to the original piece at ST and read the comments. I didn’t note any lack of respect for Blacks, just a lack of respect for Leftists.

    • Timothy Lane says:

      Of course, if you assume that all blacks are leftists (and any exceptions count as “inauthentic blacks”), then lack of regard for all leftists will include lack of regard for “authentic” blacks, which to the liberal mind (to the extent that the modern liberal actually has an individual mind) makes it racist.

    • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

      Frankly, I don’t have respect for blacks who say you have to agree with their politics and philosophy or else “you don’t have respect for blacks.” What utter nonsense.

      • Timothy Lane says:

        I think you need a minor correction, to having no respect for anyone, black or white (or whatever), who thinks all blacks have to think alike (i.e., all be leftists). After all, do you have any more respect for a white Ahab like Chris Matthews than for a black one?

        Incidentally, I recall that the Wall Street Journal, back around 1992, had a liberal lexicon that included “authentic black”. So some liberal decided to come up with a conservative version, the only problem being that (naturally) he had no idea what conservatives actually said. So he had conservatives considering only conservatives blacks “authentic” — but no conservative used such language. Property caricature must be based on truth, but this requires knowledge — and is thus difficult for liberals when writing about conservatives.

        • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

          It’s really sad, Timothy, because it’s obvious how deeply the rotten root of Cultural Marxism is. Some people can’t parse events or other people except through race. They’re race-centric. It’s so reflexive that I can’t tell what the difference is between that and racism proper.

          Me and you are not individuals to this principal. Because we are either white or conservative or critical of the black welfare/union establishment complex we must not just be bad people, but we hate black people

          The truth is what Rush Limbaugh and other conservatives say: We want every American to enjoy the blessings of liberty. But there are some ground rules. One is you can’t expect government to take care of you. You can’t blame whitey for all your problems. You can’t, as Thomas Sowell says, exempt people from civilized behavior and expect anything but deleterious results.

    • I was wondering why there were not widespread cries of racism against the District Attorney’s office for prosecuting the 35 black educators. After researching the trial, I discovered that the team of prosecutors was mostly black:

      http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/aps-prosecution-team-speaks-exclusively-channel-2-/nkwBs/

      It is reported that the prosecutors had to have extra security due to threats (probably from the black community). I think the District Attorney’s office played its hand well. They knew that in order to ensure that the trial was not hijacked by the race-baiters (in an attempt to distract from the facts of the case); they needed to use black investigators and prosecutors. The judge was the only white person that played a major role in the trial.

      • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

        They knew that in order to ensure that the trial was not hijacked by the race-baiters (in an attempt to distract from the facts of the case); they needed to use black investigators and prosecutors. The judge was the only white person that played a major role in the trial.

        My attitude, Patricia, is that this technique, although it may seem pragmatic at any one moment, simply further entrenches Cultural Marxism (that we are best defined by our race, sex, class) into society. I hope we’re not past the point where the facts of the case are most important, not the color of the skin of the prosecutor. If the later, we have truly reverted to a dumb, tribal society that is not ruled by law.

        • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

          My attitude, Patricia, is that this technique, although it may seem pragmatic at any one moment, simply further entrenches Cultural Marxism

          Sadly, theater is a large part of politics and public life. I can’t much blame the D.A.’s office of understanding the audience and trying to mitigate the possibilities for violence. Note even thought the prosecuting team was black, they still needed extra security, due to threats against them.

          And if using a completely black team reduces the possibilities of the mob screaming “racism” and using it as an excuse for bad behavior, then I understand it.

          While I agree that cultural Marxism pervades the culture, we will only be able to defeat it slowly and incrementally. Trying to get rid of it in one fell swoop will not likely work.

          • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

            One thing we know for sure: You can’t defeat race baiting by giving in to it. Someone, somewhere, needs to point out — and keep pointing out — that although men are not perfect, we need good principle and standards that we try to live up to. And one of those is that it shouldn’t make a flying fig the race of the prosecutor, cop, juror, or whomever. Only their competency matters.

            Which, Mr. Kung, is another way of saying giving in to the mob. Every time we do, we make it that much harder to do the right thing. This is how this works.

            Note even thought the prosecuting team was black, they still needed extra security, due to threats against them.

            Victimhood obviously trumps even race. There’s a pecking order. We know, from the example of Obama and Hillary, the race tends to trump gender.

            While I agree that cultural Marxism pervades the culture, we will only be able to defeat it slowly and incrementally. Trying to get rid of it in one fell swoop will not likely work.

            I wouldn’t have thought that turning a blind eye to the color of government officials was a “fell swoop” or anything particularly radical. Mr. Kung, you surprise me. You sound like an Establishment Republican! 😀

            I think the reality is that we increment ourselves into being beholden to Cultural Marxism and its assumptions regarding race when we assume we can’t just refute it to its face.

            • Kung Fu Zu Kung Fu Zu says:

              I wouldn’t have thought that turning a blind eye to the color of government officials was a “fell swoop” or anything particularly radical.

              You know the public has a limited amount of concentration and objectivity which they can expend on any particular subject. This capacity is reduced when dealing with cases dealing with race. So from a political point of view, I am content to cast the theatrical roles accordingly if the final act comes out as desired.

            • Timothy Lane says:

              He might sound like an Establishment Republican (who will talk of incremental changes), but the difference is that the latter doesn’t mean it. His attitude is realistic, which is always appropriate for a conservative.

              But it is true that selecting the prosecutors to pre-emptively appease the mob isn’t all that different from charging (indeed, overcharging) the police officers in Baltimore to appease the mob. Ochlocracy, here we come.

              • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

                Ha! Nice try, Timothy. But I think we’ve finally outed Mr. Kung as a Friend of Jeb Bush, a bona fide Establishment Republican. How long until he starts ranking on Sarah Palin, for once you go down that dark path, forever will it dominate your politics.

              • SkepticalCynic SkepticalCynic says:

                Mr. Lane, please use words that us non college grads can understand. Ochlocracy, is that a real word? I will concede that your vocabulary is greater than mine. I, now, grab my dictionary.

                Respectfully…

                We are presently governed by a mob….just a different one than you mean.

              • Timothy Lane says:

                I first encountered “ochlocracy” in a game as a description of the government of a country based on the democracy of Periclean Athens. (Hostility to the idea of democracy stemmed from such Athenian incidents as the aftermath of the battle of Arginusae and — most of all — the trial and execution of Socrates.)

      • Timothy Lane says:

        The presence of blacks doesn’t necessarily prevent race-baiting, but I suppose it helps that they all were. Of course, the crime victims were also black, but that never counts for the race-baiters.

        • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

          One thing we know for sure: You can’t defeat race baiting by giving in to it. Someone, somewhere, needs to point out — and keep pointing out — that although men are not perfect, we need good principle and standards that we try to live up to. And one of those is that it shouldn’t make a flying fig the race of the prosecutor, cop, juror, or whomever. Only their competency matters.

  3. My wise old dad use to always say, “ if you throw a rock at a crowd, the one that hollers out is the one that was hit”. That about sums up my reaction to receiving an email from Dr. Evans chastising me about what I supposedly said about her in my article, when in fact, she was not mentioned by name in the article. I had one of my colleagues, an engineer, read the exchange and he said to me, “Patricia, you wrote an objective piece about the scandal and she took it personally. If that’s not a guilty deluded person, I don’t know who is”.

    What struck me most about our exchange is that she never once acknowledged the harm done to the children. She made it all about her…. her accomplishments, her intentions, her grade point average, and her innocence.

    • Brad Nelson Brad Nelson says:

      LOL. I’d never heard that saying before. You’re dad sounds like a great fellow. And I think you’re right about having flushed out a guilty conscience.

      If this principal would really like to mend her ways, I encourage her to read (black writer) Thomas Sowell’s Inside American Education. It is a true evil travesty what is being done to our black brothers and sisters by playing the race game (or union game) instead of the education game. And not only blacks are adversely affected. Much of education in America is dumbed down because of concerns other than academic achievement.

      I’m a white person saying this, so I know I don’t count on that other side of the ideological railroad tracks. But I do hope this principal can give Dr. Sowell a read.

    • Timothy Lane says:

      This is a natural reflection of the teachers’ union mindset. Education is for their sakes, not the chiildren’s. After all, as AFT President Shanker once supposedly said (he denied it, but they certainly act that way), children don’t pay dues and thus don’t count.

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